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Maryland 

HV 

6793 

.M3S74 

1996 

FOLIO 



CRIME IN MARYLAND 




1996 UNIFORM CRIME REPORT 



GOVERNOR PARRIS N. GLENDENING 
LT. GOVERNOR KATHLEEN KENNEDY TOWNSEND 
COLONEL DAVID B. MITCHELL, SUPERINTENDENT 

MARYLAND STATE POLICE 



CENTRAL RECORDS DIVISION 

IDA J. WILLIAMS, DIRECTOR 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTING 

SECTION 

JOHN VESPA, ADMINISTRATIVE OFHCER 

VICTOR KESSLER, HELD REPRESENTATIVE 

DENISE VIDI SCHERER, ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST 




STATE OF MARYLAND 

MARYLAND STATE POLICE 

1201 REISTERSTOWN ROAD 

PIKESVILLE, MARYLAND 21208-3899 

(410)486-3101 

TDD 410^86-0677 



December 29, 1997 




COLONEL DAVID B MITCHEU 



The Honorable Parris N. Glendening 

Governor 

State of Maryland 

State House 

Annapolis MD 21401 

Dear Governor Glendening: 

The Maryland State Police respectfully submits the 1996 
Uniform Crime Report, Crime in Maryland , pursuant to Article 88B, 
Sections 9 and 10 of the Annotated Code of Maryland. This 
edition represents the Twenty-second Annual Report prepared under 
the Statewide Uniform Crime Reporting Program. 

Throughout the State of Maryland, in a cooperative effort, 
all law enforcement agencies submit monthly crime data to the 
Central Records Division, Maryland State Police. Through a 
strict verification process, every effort is made to authenticate 
the accuracy and completeness of the published report. 



Crime in Maryland can help law enforcement personnel and 
state officials by providing valuable information for use in 
planning effective crime prevention programs, assessing crime 
patterns and developing legislation to combat criminal activity. 
As always, I am readily available should you have any comments or 
concerns . 



"sincerely. 




DBM:IJW:kj 



Da^^id.-«< Mitchell 
superintendent rVoLrolo^ 

t7'?3 

"Maryland's Finest" f o\ <'o 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Introduction 1 

Crime Factors 7 

Crime Index Offenses 9 

Murder 13 

Rape 22 

Robbery 2 6 

Aggravated Assault 3 

Breaking or Entering 34 

Larceny 3 8 

Motor Vehicle Theft 42 

Arson 46 

Index Offense Data 49 

Maryland UCR Crime Index Report by Region, County & Agency 51 

Municipality Crime Rate 88 

Maryland Arrest Data 98 

Drug Arrest County Chart 101 

Arrests - Sex & Race 107 

Arrests - Age 108 

Maryland Arrest Report by Region, County & Agency 110 

Law Enforcement Officers Killed 182 

Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted 183 

Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted by Region, 

County & Agency 185 

Law Enforcement Employee Data 198 

Law Enforcement Employee Rates 199 

Law Enforcement Employee Data by Region, County & Agency.. 200 
Ten Year Crime Index Chart 206 



Note: The 1996 Annual Motor Vehicle Robbery ("Carjacking") Report 
and Domestic Violence Report (formerly entitled Battered 
Spouse Report) are separate publications. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/stateofmarylandu1996stat 



INTRODUCTION 



BACKGROUND 

The Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program is one measure 
that has been taken in the establishment of an effective Criminal 
Justice Information System (CJIS) for the State. This particular 
phase focuses on the incidence of crime and law enforcement. It 
establishes a method to collect, evaluate and process uniform 
statistical data on crime statewide. The Maryland UCR Program 
provides the means to forward more valid data to the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation from a single agency and also to consolidate it 
into an annual report entitled Crime in Maryland . 



NATIONAL UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING PROGRAM 

The counterpart of the Maryland UCR Program is the National UCR 
Program which is under the direction of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. The National Program resulted from a need for a 
uniform compilation of crime statistics nationwide. Uniform Crime 
Reports were first collected in 193 after being developed by a 
committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. The 
lACP continues to serve in an advisory capacity to the FBI in the 
current operation of the Program. 

Crime statistics voluntarily submitted by individual law enforcement 
agencies from all fifty states are presented annually in the FBI ' s 
publication entitled Crime in the United States . 



MARYLAND UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING PROGRAM 

The FBI has actively assisted individual states in the development 
of State UCR Programs compatible with the National Program. 
Maryland took advantage of this assistance in 1972 and was able to 
develop its own program by 1975. 

The Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program became operational 
January 1, 1975. This program consists of the uniform 
classification, review, compilation and analysis of crime statistics 
reported by all law enforcement agencies of the State pursuant to 
the guidelines and regulations prescribed by law. 

The responsibility and authority for the collection and 
dissemination of UCR data is assigned to the Department of Maryland 
State Police, under Article 88B, Sections 9 and 10, of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland. 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 

In keeping with the recommendation of the President's Commission on 
Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, the Maryland UCR 
Program was planned for eventual growth into a complete and 
integrated offender based Criminal Justice Information System. 
Under this program, each offender arrested in Maryland is tracked 
through the entire criminal justice system from time of arrest, 
through the courts, to the- correctional system where their exit 
(parole, expiration of sentence, etc.) will be recorded. In this 
manner, a complete "criminal history" on individual offenders will 
be available for use by the police, courts and correctional agencies 
in Maryland. In addition, statistical data derived from the CJIS 
Program will provide assistance in determining the overall 
efficiency of the Criminal Justice System in Maryland and will make 
effective management studies possible. 

The fundamental objectives of the Maryland UCR Program are: 

1. Inform the Governor, legislature, other 
governmental officials and the public as to the 
nature, magnitude and trends of the crime problem 
in Maryland. 

2. Provide law enforcement administrators with 
criminal statistics for administrative and 
operational use. 

3. Determine who commits crimes by age, sex, race 
and other attributes in order to find the proper 
focus for crime prevention and enforcement . 

4. Provide base data and statistics to measure the 
workload and effectiveness of Maryland's Criminal 
Justice System. 

5. Provide base data and statistics to measure the 
effects of prevention and deterrence programs. 

6. Provide base data and statistics for research to 
improve the efficiency, effectiveness and 
performance of criminal justice agencies. 

7. Provide base data to assist in the assessment of 
social and other causes of crime for the 
development of theories of criminal behavior. 

8. Provide the FBI with complete UCR data to be 
included in the national crime reports. 



REPORTING PROCEDURES 

Under the Maryland UCR Program, law enforcement agencies are 
required to submit specified Uniform Crime Reports. The necessary 
information for each of the required reports is gathered from each 
agencies record of complaints, investigations and arrests. 



Crime data and information is submitted by state, county and 
municipal law enforcement agencies monthly on the number of offenses 
known to them in the following crime categories: 

(1) Criminal Homicide 

(2) Forcible Rape 

( 3 ) Robbery 

(4) Assault 

(5) Breaking or Entering 

(6) Larceny-theft 

(7) Motor Vehicle Theft 

(8) Arson* 

The count of offenses is taken from the record of complaints 
received by law enforcement agencies. This information comes from 
victims, witnesses, other sources or discovered by law enforcement 
during their own operation. Complaints deteirmined by subsequent 
investigation to be unfounded are eliminated from count. The 
resulting number of "actual offenses known to law enforcement 
agencies" in these crime categories are reported without regard for 
whether anyone is arrested, stolen property is recovered, local 
prosecutive policy or any other consideration. 

Reported offenses are recorded by the municipality and county in 
which they occur. Municipal law enforcement agencies report those 
crimes which occur within the cities and state. County agencies 
report those crimes which occur in the counties outside the cities. 

A supplemental report is also submitted each month showing the value 
of stolen and recovered property, the type of property and the type 
of offense within a crime category in which it was taken. This 
report also shows the number of stolen vehicles recovered locally 
and by other jurisdictions. In addition, each agency reports the 
number of persons arrested by them or other agencies for crimes 
which have occurred within their jurisdiction. The arrest report 
also shows the age, sex and race of those arrested and the 
disposition of juveniles by the arresting agency. When applicable, 
supplemental reports are submitted regarding the persons, weapons 
and circumstances, etc., involved in homicides, spousal or officer 
assaults and "carjackings". In addition, police employee data is 
collected on an annual basis. 



VERIFICATION PROCESS 

A major concern in the collection of crime statistics for law 
enforcement agencies throughout the state is the uniformity and 
accuracy of data received. Program aides such as guides and 
instructional classes do not necessarily guarantee the accuracy of 
the reports submitted by the contributors, therefore, additional 
controls are necessary. 

*MonthlY arson reports are submitted for law enforcement agencies by the State 
Fire Marshal's Office and designated county agencies. 



Each report received by the UCR section is recorded, examined and 
verified for mathematical accuracy and possibly more important for 
reasonableness. The verification process includes numerous checks 
to ensure the validity of information. The elimination of duplicate 
reporting by individual contributors receives particular attention. 
Minor errors- are corrected by telephone contact with the 
contributors. Substantial variations and errors are adjusted 
through personal contacts. The personal contacts are invaluable to 
the accuracy and quality of reporting. Field Records 
Representatives are engaged in a constant educational effort and as 
such, provide a vital link between the UCR Program and the 
contributor. 



POPULATION DATA 

The computation of crime rates as they appear in this report by 
municipality, county and state are based on the latest available 
population estimates for the year. These population estimates are 
provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation through the 
cooperation and assistance of the United States Bureau of Census. 



LIMITATIONS OF A UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING PROGRAM 

Information currently collected by the Maryland Program is generally 
the same as that gathered by the National System and the methods of 
classifying and scoring offenses and arrests are the same. This 
readily enables comparisons with other states and with the nation, 
as a whole. However, there are limitations to the information 
collected which should be clearly understood before any conclusions 
are drawn from the UCR data presented in this report. 

The main goal of the UCR Program is to furnish police administrators 
with a measure of their activities and operational problems as 
indicated by the number of reported offenses, arrests, clearances, 
etc . 

A first step in the control of crime is to ascertain the true 
dimensions of the problem. However, present statistics as gathered 
by the UCR Program measure neither the real incidence of crime or 
the full amount of economic loss to victims. Infoirmation regarding 
number of offenses, clearances, value and type of property stolen 
and recovered property are collected only for the eight Part I 
offenses. For Part II offenses the only information submitted is 
the number of arrests for these crimes. Consequently, there is no 
record of the actual number of these offenses occurring, or is there 
a calculation made for property loss. 

The Crime Index does not explicitly take into account the varying 
degrees of seriousness of its seven components (excluding arson) . 
Each crime receives the same weight as it is added to the index, 
consequently, an auto theft is counted the same as a murder and an 
aggravated assault is weighed equally with an attempted breaking or 
entering. Any review of crime must consider the volume, rate and 



trend of each offense that comprises the index and the relationship 
between these seven crimes* . 

The Maryland and National Uniform Crime Reporting Programs are 
designed to measure offenses committed and persons arrested. 
Difficulties can arise if this distinction is not kept clearly in 
mind. Crimes relate to events, arrests relate to persons. Unlike 
traffic violations where there is usually one event, violation and 
offender, a single criminal act can involve several crimes, 
offenders and victims. Relating specific crimes to a criminal or 
offense to evaluate characteristics of those arrested, is generally 
beyond the scope of the present Uniform Crime Reporting System. 

Juvenile crime and arrest statistics, because of their nature, are 
another area of misunderstanding. Many juvenile offenders are 
handled informally, as a consequence, inaccurate or incomplete 
recording of the event or action may result. Procedures for 
handling juveniles vary between departments more so than the 
handling of adult offenders. Furthermore, the degree of juvenile 
involvement in cleared offenses is probably seriously misunderstood 
because the juvenile clearance indicator is recorded only when 
juveniles are exclusively involved. When both adults and juveniles 
are subjects in a clearance, the juvenile participation is not 
reported. 

The preceding comments should not be viewed as an indictment of the 
Uniform Crime Reporting Program which, admittedly, is designed for 
the operational requirements of law enforcement agencies . While the 
current method of gathering and reporting crime and arrest data 
provide a less than complete picture of criminality in our society, 
the FBI has designed the National Incident Based Reporting System to 
address these limitations and is in its early stages of 
implementation nationally. 



'^ Arson is not used at this time in computing the Crime Index. 

5 



CRIME FACTORS 



statistics compiled under the Uniform Crime Reporting Program from 
data submitted by the law enforcement agencies of Maryland projects 
a statewide view of crime. Awareness of the presence of certain 
crime factors which may influence the resulting volume and type of 
statistics presented is necessary if fair and equitable conclusions 
are to be drawn. These crime influencing factors are present to 
some degree in every community, and their presence affects in 
varying degrees the crime experience of that community. Attempts 
at comparison of crime figures between communities should not be 
made without first considering the individual factors present in 
each community. 

Crime, as an outgrowth of society, remains a social problem of grave 
concern, and the police are limited in their role to its suppression 
and detection. As stated by the President's Commission on Law 
Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice in their report 
"The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1967 - Page 92) : 

"But the fact that the police deal daily with crime does 
not mean that they have unlimited power to prevent it, 
or reduce it, or deter it. The police did not create 
and cannot resolve the social conditions that stimulate 
crime. They did not start and cannot stop the 
convulsive social changes that are taking place in 
America. They do not enact the laws that they are 
required to enforce, nor do they dispose of the 
criminals they arrest. The police are only one part of 
the criminal justice system; the criminal justice system 
is only one part of the government; and the government 
is only one part of society. In so far as crime is a 
social phenomenon, crime prevention is the 
responsibility of every part of society. The criminal 
process is limited to case by case operations, one 
criminal or one crime at a time." 

Listed below are some of the conditions which affect the type and 
volume of crime that occurs from place to place: 

Density and size of the community population 
and the metropolitan area of which it is a 
part . 

Composition of the population with particular 
reference to age, sex and race. 

Economic status of the population. 

Relative stability of the population including 
niimber and ratio of seasonal visitors/ 
residents, commuters and other transients. 



climate and seasonal weather conditions. 

Educational, recreational and religious 
characteristics . 

Standards governing appointments to the police 
force. 

Policies of the .prosecuting officials and the 
courts . 

Attitude of the public toward law enforcement 
problems . 

The administrative and investigative efficiency 
of the local law enforcement agency, including 
the degree of adherence to crime reporting 
standards . 

Organization and cooperation of adjoining and 
overlapping police jurisdictions. 



CRIME INDEX OFFENSES 



The crime counts listed in this publication are actual offenses 
established by police investigation. When police receive a complaint 
of a crime and the follow-up investigation discloses no crime 
occurred, it is "unfounded" . In 1996, police investigations that 
were "unfounded" represented 3 percent of the complaints concerning 
index offenses, ranging from 1 percent in the aggravated assault 
category to 13 percent in the rape categoiry as compared to 1995, when 
there was 1 percent "unfounded" in the aggravated assault category 
and 13 percent in the rape category. 

A total of 308,903 actual Index Offenses were reported to law 
enforcement agencies in Maryland during the calendar year 1996. This 
represents a decrease of 3 percent when compared to the 1995 total of 
317,329 Crime Index Offenses. 

An analysis of Index Offenses by month in 1996 shows that August had 
the highest frequency of occurrence and February had the lowest. In 
1995, August also had the highest frequency of occurrence and 
February the lowest. 

The Crime Index Offenses represent the most common problem to law 
enforcement. They are serious crimes by their nature, volume, or 
frequency of occurrence. They are categorized as Violent Crimes, 
which includes Murder, Forcible Rape, Robbery and Aggravated Assault, 
or as Property Crimes which includes Breaking or Entering, Larceny- 
Theft and Motor Vehicle Theft. 



VIOLENT CRIME 

violent Crimes involve the element of personal confrontation between 
the perpetrator and the victim; consequently, they are considered 
more serious than Property Crimes because of their very nature. 
These offenses accounted for 15 percent of the total Crime Index for 
1996. In 1995, Violent Crimes accounted for 16 percent of the total 
Crime Index. Violent Crime decreased 5 percent compared to 1995. 

Analyzing the Violent Crimes by month reveals July had the greatest 
frequency of occurrence, while February had the lowest. In 1995, 
August had the highest frequency of occurrence and February had the 
lowest . 

PROPERTY CRIMES 

The number of Property Crimes reported during 1996, was more than 5 
times greater than the number of Violent Crimes reported. As a 
group. Property Crimes made up 85 percent of the total Crime Index in 
1996. In 1995, Property Crime made up 84 percent of the total Crime 
Index. Property Crime decreased 2 percent in 1996. A monthly 
analysis showed August had the highest frequency of occurrence and 
February the lowest, the same as in 1995. 



RATES 

Crime Rates relate the incidence of crime to the resident population. 
Many other factors which may contribute to the volume and type of 
crime in a given jurisdiction are not incorporated here, but are 
shown in the section entitled "Crime Factors". 

In 1996, the Crime Rate for Maryland was 6,090.4 victims for every 
100,000 population. This represents a 3 percent decrease in the 
Crime Rate when compared to the 1995 rate of 6,293.7. 

The 1996 Crime Rate for the Violent Crime group was 931.1 victims per 
100,000 inhabitants, a 6 percent decrease compared with the 1995 rate 
of 986.8. The Property Crime group had a rate of 5159.2 victims, a 
3 percent decrease when compared to the 1995 rate of 5,3 06.9. 

CLEARANCES 

For Unifoirm Crime Reporting purposes, a crime is cleared when police 
have identified the offender, have evidence to charge him and 
actually take him into custody. Solutions of crimes are also recorded 
in exceptional instances where some element beyond police control 
precludes formal charges against the offender, such as the victim's 
refusal to prosecute or local prosecution is declined because the 
subject is being prosecuted elsewhere for a crime committed in 
another jurisdiction. The arrest of one person can clear several 
crimes or several persons may be arrested in the process of solving 
one crime. 

Maryland Law Enforcement Agencies cleared 22 percent of all Index 
Offenses reported to them in 1996, as compared to 21 percent in 1995. 

The Violent Crimes recorded a 45 percent clearance rate in 1996 
compared to 43 percent in 1995. The Property Crime group experienced 
an 18 percent clearance rate in 199 6 as compared to 17 percent in 
1995. 

Considered individually the 1996 Violent Crime clearance rate was 
determined to be 61 percent of the Murders, 58 percent of the Rapes, 
24 percent of the Robberies and 61 percent of the Aggravated 
Assaults. The Property Crime clearance rates were 16 percent for 
Breaking or Entering, 20 percent for Larceny-Theft and 14 percent for 
Motor Vehicle Theft. 

The relatively high clearance rate for Violent Crimes as compared to 
Non-Violent Property Crimes is in part attributable to the volume 
difference between the two. Property Crime volume is much greater 
than that of Violent Crime and police investigation of Violent Crime 
is usually more intense. While the element of direct contact between 
the victim and perpetrator, as well as witness identification also 
contributes to this higher rate of solution for Violent Crime, 
stealth is involved to a greater degree in the Property Crime. 



10 



JUVENILE CLEARANCES 

A juvenile clearance is the clearance of an offense in which all of 
the offenders involved were under the age of 18. If even one of the 
offenders was over 17 years of age, the clearance of that offense is 
not considered a juvenile clearance. In 1996, such juvenile 
clearances represented 19 percent of all clearances, the same as 
1995. 

Juvenile clearances in the Violent Crime category represented 16 
percent of the total cleared in 1996 with 12 percent of all 
clearances in Homicide cases, 9 percent of those in Rape cases, 17 
percent in Robbery cases and 16 percent in Aggravated Assault cases. 
Juvenile clearances were 15 percent of all clearances in the Violent 
Crime category in 1995. 

In the Property Crime category, clearances involving Juvenile 
offenders represented 21 percent of the total cases cleared in 1996, 
with 19 percent of all clearances in Burglary cases, 21 percent of 
those in Larceny-Theft cases and 28 percent in Motor Vehicle Theft 
cases. Juvenile clearances were 21 percent of all clearances in the 
Property Crime category in 1995. 



STOLEN PROPERTY VALUE 

The total value of Property Stolen during 1996 was $399,403,796 which 
represents a 3 percent decrease from 1995. Recovered Property 
amounted to $160,582,835 which is 40 percent of the total stolen, 
resulting in a $238,820,961 property loss to victims in the State of 
Maryland during 1996. This property loss represents a 9 percent 
decrease when compared to the property loss in 1995. 



5 YEAR TREND 

5 YEAR 
AVERAGE 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 

Stolen 378 399 414 384 344 347 

Recovered 150 161 151 154 136 149 

Value in Millions 



11 



MURDER 



MURDER 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter is the willful (non-negligent 
killing of one human being by another. 



VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, a total of 588 murders were reported, this represents 
an 1 percent decrease over 1995. Murder accounted for 1 percent of 
all violent crime and .2 percent of the crime index. In 1996, 
there were 11.6 murders per 100,000 population. 



ANALYSIS OF MURDER 

In 1996, 356 murders were cleared with 12 percent of these 
clearances involving only juvenile offenders. A total of 645 
persons were arrested for murder during 1996. A breakdown of 
persons arrested for murder was 93 percent male, 7 percent female, 
23 percent juvenile, 87 percent black, 12 percent white and less 
than 1 percent Asian. 

During 1996, 239 of the murder victims were in the 30 and older age 
group representing 41 percent of the total. 

Handguns were used in 69 percent of the reported murders in 1996. 
This represents a 3 percent increase in their use when compared to 
the handgun use in 1995. 

The next most used weapon was a knife accounting for 12 percent of 
the reported murders in 1996. This represents a 19 percent 
decrease compared to 1995. 

Drug related murders accounted for 8 percent of the total . In 
1995 drug related murders, accounted for 11 percent of the total. 

Family members as offenders in murder accounted for 11 percent 
while boyfriend or girlfriend (those not cohabitating) reflects 1 
percent of the total reported. There was a 68 percent increase in 
family related murders while boyfriend or girlfriend murders 
decreased 71 percent. Additionally, an acquaintance is listed in 
19 percent of the murders reported in 1996, Strangers and unknown 
relationships accounted for two other large categories, 7 percent 
and 72 percent respectively. 

In 43 percent of the murders, the offenders are unknown and not 
described. When the race of the victim and offender is known the 
offender is most often someone of the same race. 



13 



VICTIM, DESCRIBED OFFENDER 
RACE RELATIONS 



VICTIM 



TOTAL 
MURDERS 



DESCRIBED 
OFFENDER 



SAME RACE 
OFFENDER 



PERCENT 
DISTRIBUTION 



White 
Black 
Asian 



101 

479 

7 



76 
252 

6 



49 
244 





65 % 

97 % 

% 



MURDER 



Total Number of Murders 



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14 



Murder by County 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 

Average 


Allegany 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Anne Arundel 


16 


17 


11 


TO 


12 


16 


Baltimore City 


333 


325 


321 


353 


335 


333 


Baltimore 


34 


38 


31 


36 


43 


36 


Calvert 


1 


4 


2 


4 







Caroline 








2 


3 




~) 


Carroll 


1 


1 


2 


4 




2 


Cecil 





2 


2 


5 





2 


Charles 


11 


10 


3 


5 


7 


7 


Dorchester 





2 





2 





1 


Frederick 


4 


4 


10 


4 


3 


5 


Garrett 


1 


1 





1 





1 


Harford 


6 


5 


6 





6 


5 


Howard 


5 


3 


4 


5 


6 


5 


Kent 








1 











Montgomery 


13 


21 


34 


30 


21 


24 


Prince George's 


142 


137 


127 


141 


134 


136 


Queen Anne's 


1 








1 


2 


1 


St. Mary's 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


Somerset 


1 


5 


1 





1 


2 


Talbot 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Washington 


1 


5 


9 


5 


2 


4 


Wicomico 


3 


4 


2 


3 


8 


4 


Worcester 


2 


4 


2 


1 


4 


3 


*Statewide Agencies 





3 


4 


2 


3 


2 


State 


588 


596 


579 


632 


596 


598 



* Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

15 



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20 



RAPE 



Forcible rape is defined as the carnal knowledge of a female 
forcibly and against her will. 

VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, 1,907 actual forcible rapes were reported, this 
represents a 10 percent decrease over 1995. Rape accounted for 4 
percent of the violent crime and .6 percent of the crime index. In 
1996, there were 37.6 forcible rapes per 100,000 population. 

ANALYSIS OF RAPE 

Rape by force accounted for 87 percent of all forcible rapes and 
13 percent were attempt to rape. 

In 1996, 1,908 forcible rapes were cleared with 9 percent of these 
clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 

A total of 687 persons were arrested for forcible rape during 1996. 
A breakdown of persons arrested for forcible rape was, 18 percent 
juvenile, 65 percent black, 34 percent white and less than 1 
percent consisting of American Indian and Asian. 



5 YEAR TREND 
OFFENSES & CRIME RATE* 







5 Year 
















Average 


1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


Force 




1,798 


1,652 


1,833 


1,739 


1,861 


1,904 


Attempt 




310 


255 


297 


298 


324 


376 


Total 




2,108 


1,907 


2,130 


2,037 


2,185 


2,280 


Crime ra 


te 


42 


38 


42 


41 


44 


47 



*Rapes per 100,000 population 



22 



RAPE 

Total Number of Rapes 



n 



n 



r 



mn-n-^p. 



1nn 

I 

H ri 11 H H 



I li i i I 



19B6 1991 



Rape Rate per 100,000 Population 



10.0 





» ■ P 

__ si w; ■'' p 


■ n 

1 

1 

r r 'T'' '"1" 'r i ' i i i i ' 


^1 III 

Mrrrrn^yn^" 

1^ n r r i \ i n i i 

1 1 ! Z ' i t Z 

Nil Z i 

: ZZ„Zj-.-lZZZi 



1986 



1991 



23 



Rape by County 



I 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


15 


16 


13 


15 


12 


14 


Anne Arundel 


86 


111 


132 


141 


136 


121 


Baltimore City 


643 


684 


639 


668 


754 


678 


Baltimore 


276 


251 


288 


283 


303 


280 


Calvert 


12 


22 


11 


14 


14 


15 


Caroline 


11 


12 


7 


6 


8 


9 


Carroll 


30 


30 


27 


35 


33 


31 


Cecil 


13 


11 


18 


13 


23 


16 


Charles 


42 


37 


22 


22 


24 


29 


Dorchester 


15 


19 


8 


13 


15 


14 


Frederick 


42 


40 


39 


48 


57 


45 


Garrett 


3 


5 


6 


3 


5 


4 


Harford 


51 


64 


34 


58 


45 


50 


Howard 


34 


33 


31 


26 


43 


33 


Kent 


1 


6 


6 


5 


1 


4 


Montgomery 


160 


222 


199 


212 


189 


196 


Prince George's 


344 


405 


413 


459 


452 


415 


Queen Anne's 


3 


15 


10 


6 


4 


8 


St. Mary's 


30 


23 


26 


35 


27 


28 


Somerset 


8 


13 


13 


11 


11 


11 


Talbot 


8 


13 


16 


9 


11 


11 


Washington 


23 


28 


24 


27 


30 


26 


Wicomico 


36 


47 


42 


51 


65 


48 


Worcester 


20 


23 


13 


21 


17 


19 


♦Statewide Agencies 


1 








4 


1 


1 


State 


1,907 


2,130 


2,037 


2,185 


2,280 


2,108 



Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

24 



ROBBERY 



ROBBERY 



♦ 



Robbery is the taking or attempting to take anything of value from 
the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or 
threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. 

VOLUME AND RATES 

During 1996, there were 19,935 robbery offenses reported, this 
represents a 7 percent decrease over 1995. Robbery accounted for 
42 percent of the violent crime and 6 percent of the crime index. 
In 1996, there were 393.0 robberies per 100,000 population. 



ANALYSIS OF ROBBERY 

During 1996, 60 percent of the robberies were committed on the 
street, while only 2 percent were bank robberies. Of the total 
number of robberies committed, firearm accounted for 52 percent 
while robberies committed with no weapon accounted for 34 percent 
of the total. 

In 1996, 4,686 robberies were cleared with 17 percent of these 
clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 

A total of 4,462 persons were arrested for robbery during 1996. A 
breakdown of persons arrested for robbery was 93 percent male, 7 
percent female, 3 6 percent juvenile, 81 percent black, 19 percent 
white and less than 1 percent consisting of American Indian and 
Asian. 



DISTRIBUTION BY NATURE 



Classification 



Number of 
Offenses 



Percent of 
Distribution 



Total 
Value 



Highway 


11 


958 


60% 


Commercial House 


3 


286 


16% 


Service Station 




379 


2% 


Convenience Store 




619 


3% 


Resident 


2 


023 


10% 


Bank 




341 


2% 


Miscellaneous 


1 


329 


7% 


Total 


19 


,935 


100% 



8,561,156 

4, 947, 672 

354,832 

223,685 

2,105,909 

1,296,561 

991,282 

18,481,097 



26 



ROBBERY 

Total Number of Robberies 



25,000 - 



n 



Robbery Rate per 100,000 Population 



n 



27 



Robbery by County 








1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


13 


18 


18 


21 


16 


17 


Anne Arundel 


771 


763 


692 


647 


655 


706 


Baltimore City 


10,429 


11,397 


11,303 


12,408 


12,290 


11,565 


Baltimore 


2,427 


2,473 


2,180 


2,311 


2,307 


2,340 


Calvert 


9 


8 


16 


17 


13 


13 


Caroline 


10 


10 


9 


10 


5 


9 


Carroll 


63 


47 


50 


39 


61 


52 


Cecil 


37 


31 


30 


33 


29 


32 


Charles 


116 


151 


129 


100 


119 


123 


Dorchester 


32 


41 


23 


16 


26 


28 


Frederick 


128 


141 


109 


103 


107 


118 


Garrett 


2 





3 


4 


3 


2 


Harford 


134 


151 


123 


84 


116 


122 


Howard 


251 


213 


149 


130 


135 


176 


Kent 


4 


2 


7 


9 


3 


5 


Montgomery 


1,038 


1,088 


937 


903 


993 


992 


Prince George's 


4,078 


4,403 


3,984 


4,400 


3,786 


4,130 


Queen Anne's 


8 


8 


4 


11 


11 


8 


St. Mary's 


45 


51 


44 


49 


52 


48 


Somerset 


18 


12 


16 


19 


13 


16 


Talbot 


35 


17 


15 


26 


22 


23 


Washington 


88 


66 


75 


70 


71 


74 


Wicomico 


156 


192 


196 


138 


187 


174 


Worcester 


42 


41 


31 


28 


29 


34 


*Statewide Agencies 


1 


7 


3 


4 


5 


4 


State 


19,935 


21,331 


20,146 


21,580 


21,054 


20,809 



Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

28 



AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 



Aggravated assault is an unlawful attack by one person upon another 
for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. 



VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, a total of 24,798 aggravated assaults were reported, 
this represents a 4 percent decrease over 1995. Aggravated 
assaults accounted for 53 percent of the violent crime category and 
8 percent of the crime index. In 1996, there were 488.9 aggravated 
assaults per 100,000 population. 

There were 77,607 simple assaults reported in 1996 for a total of 
102,405 aggravated and simple assaults. 



ANALYSIS OF ASSAULT 

During 1996, 20 percent of the aggravated assaults were with 
firearms, 20 percent with a knife or cutting instrument, 43 percent 
with other weapon and 17 percent with personal weapons; hands, 
fist, feet, etc. 

In 1996, 15,109 aggravated assaults were cleared with 16 percent 
of these clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 

A total of 8,058 persons were arrested for aggravated assault 
during 1996. A breakdown of persons arrested for aggravated 
assault was 79 percent male, 21 percent female, 27 percent 
juvenile, 58 percent black, 41 percent white and less than 1 
percent consisting of American Indian and Asian. 







5 YEAR TREND 










5 Year 














Average 


1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


Firearm 


5,677 


5,041 


5,428 


5,636 


6,211 


6,071 


Knife 


5,070 


4,996 


4,819 


5,277 


5,184 


5,076 


Other 


10,174 


10,636 


10,620 


9,926 


9,751 


9,938 


Hands, etc. 


4,170 


4,125 


4,832 


3,853 


4,015 


4,025 


Total 


25,092 


24,798 


25,699 


24,692 


25,161 


25,110 



i 



30 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

Total Number of Aggravated Assaults 



15,000 

















nrnnfin 


n ' i 

1 ] 
1 I j_ 


r-j 




^hD^O^W^l 


j 

1 r 


1 i L; ! 1 i i i,: 1, M ; i M M , 





Aggravated Assault Rate per 100,000 Population 



200.0 — — 




rii^v 



n 



h 



^ L U 



1986 



31 



Aggravated Assault by County 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


299 


372 


302 


343 


333 


330 


Anne Arundel 


1,267 


1,081 


1,287 


1,394 


1,177 


1,241 


Baltimore City 


8,216 


9,172 


8,748 


8,577 


8,481 


8,639 


Baltimore 


4,690 


4,935 


4,761 


4,864 


5,090 


4,868 


Calvert 


192 


203 


179 


178 


142 


179 


Caroline 


138 


129 


65 


46 


44 


84 


Carroll 


268 


186 


178 


117 


121 


174 


Cecil 


321 


287 


306 


330 


319 


313 


Charles 


477 


522 


451 


436 


490 


475 


Dorchester 


154 


198 


167 


228 


176 


185 


Frederick 


782 


555 


559 


758 


679 


667 


Garrett 


31 


51 


47 


42 


83 


51 


Harford 


363 


418 


418 


397 


436 


406 


Howard 


343 


382 


403 


348 


404 


376 


Kent 


53 


77 


61 


71 


60 


64 


Montgomery 


1,075 


1,190 


1,145 


1,135 


1,296 


1,168 


Prince George's 


4,499 


4,031 


3,815 


3,993 


3,917 


4,051 


Queen Anne's 


49 


57 


92 


98 


122 


84 


St. Mary's 


253 


260 


244 


271 


316 


269 


Somerset 


106 


55 


78 


107 


155 


100 


Talbot 


85 


159 


122 


146 


106 


124 


Washington 


318 


398 


282 


265 


289 


310 


Wicomico 


538 


505 


588 


551 


503 


537 


Worcester 


204 


202 


193 


212 


270 


216 


*Statewide Agencies 


77 


274 


201 


254 


101 


181 


State 


24,798 


25,699 

' 


24,692 


25,161 


25,110 


25,092 



Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

32 



BREAKING 

OR 
ENTERING 



BREAKING OR ENTERING 



Breaking or entering is defined as the unlawful entry of a 
structure to commit a felony or a theft. 



VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, a total of 50,316 breaking or enterings were reported, 
this represents a 6 percent decrease over 1995. Breaking or 
entering accounted for 19 percent of the property crime category 
and 16 percent of the crime index. In 199 6, there were 9 92.0 
breaking or entering offenses per 100,000 population. 



ANALYSIS OF BREAKING OR ENTERING 

During 1996, 70 percent of the breaking or entering offenses 
involved forcible entry, 2 percent were unlawful entry without 
force and 10 percent were recorded as attempted forcible entry. 
Residential offenses accounted for 65 percent of the total offenses 
while 35 percent were nonresidential. The average dollar value 
loss was $1148 . 

In 1996, 8,187 breaking or entering offenses were cleared with 19 
percent of these clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 

A total of 8,758 persons were arrested for breaking or entering 
during 1996. A breakdown of persons arrested for breaking or 
entering was 89 percent male, 11 percent female, 34 percent 
juvenile, 50 percent black, 49 percent white and less than 1 
percent consisting of American Indian and Asian, 

PLACE AND TIME OF OCCURRENCE 









Number of 


Percent 




rotal Value 


Classification 






Offenses 


Distribution 






Residence Total 






32,744 


65% 


$ 


37,332,844 


Night 6 P.M. -6 


A 


M. 


8,350 


17% 




6,972,775 


Day 6 A.M. -6 


P 


M. 


12,241 


24% 




14,419, 085 


Unknown 






12,153 


24% 




15,940,984 


Non Residence 






17,572 


35% 


$ 


20,449,618 


Night 6 P.M. -6 


A 


M. 


7,107 


14% 




7,117,316 


Day 6 A.M. -6 


P 


M. 


2, 654 


5% 




2,424,690 


Unknown 






7,811 


16% 




10,907,612 


Grand Total 






50,316 


1005-0 


$ 


57,782,462 



34 



BREAKING or ENTERING 



Total Number of Breaking or Enterlngs 



n 



50.000 
40,000 -\- 



h 



H 



n 



Ml I i M 



h 



f-n^Mhr 



H 



Breaking or Entering Rate per 100,000 Population 



2.000.0 





i 


rnnH 

i 1 

\ 


p 

1 IpnrPn 

III i 

\ 1 ^ 

"■ i r" '"i r I :'' 1" 


i 1 1 

: J ■ 

§- 

':^ 'J K' 


^_ 




E 


\ 
1 

. 1 


[ 



35 



Breaking or Entering by County 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


450 


387 


386 


384 


483 


418 


Anne Arundel 


4,003 


3,498 


3,644 


4,029 


4,205 


3,876 


Baltimore City 


14,887 


16,705 


16,026 


18,076 


16,503 


16,439 


Baltimore 


6,972 


7,637 


7,353 


8,050 


8,322 


7,667 


Calvert 


342 


338 


300 


286 


297 


313 


Caroline 


207 


187 


180 


205 


196 


195 


Carroll 


654 


656 


681 


793 


744 


706 


Cecil 


587 


555 


499 


629 


647 


583 


Charles 


838 


948 


831 


697 


724 


808 


Dorchester 


305 


255 


329 


361 


333 


317 


Frederick 


691 


812 


777 


900 


940 


824 


Garrett 


148 


139 


186 


187 


158 


164 


Harford 


1,317 


1,145 


1,207 


1,315 


1,435 


1,284 


Howard 


1,280 


1,431 


1,248 


1,490 


1,673 


1,424 


Kent 


108 


126 


116 


155 


143 


130 


Montgomery 


4,670 


4,817 


4,625 


4,648 


4,971 


4,746 


Prince George's 


9,319 


10,231 


10,352 


10,323 


9,882 


10,021 


Queen Anne's 


215 


160 


246 


270 


296 


237 


St. Mary's 


609 


541 


555 


581 


664 


590 


Somerset 


224 


228 


260 


267 


259 


248 


Talbot 


200 


218 


285 


252 


293 


250 


Washington 


698 


635 


562 


755 


686 


667 


Wicomico 


1,036 


1,156 


1,090 


1,088 


1,084 


1,091 


Worcester 


541 


457 


459 


443 


543 


489 


*Statewide Agencies 


15 


49 


28 


53 


40 


37 


State 


50,316 


53,311 


52,225 


56,237 


55,521 


53,522 



* Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

36 



LARCENY- 
THEFT 



LARCENY-THEFT 



Larceny- theft is the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding 
away of property from the possession or constructive possession of 
another. 



VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, a total of 175,283 larceny-thefts were reported, this 
represents a decrease of 2 percent over 1995. Larceny-theft 
accounted for 67 percent of the property crime total and 57 percent 
of the crime index. In 1996, there were 3,455.9 larceny-thefts per 
100,000 population. 



ANALYSIS OF LARCENY-THEFT 

Of the total larceny- thefts reported, the highest percentage 2 8 were 
from motor vehicle while pocket-picking accounted for the lowest 
percentage of . 

In 1996, 34,22 larceny- theft offenses were cleared with 21 percent 
of these clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 

A total of 3 0,448 persons were arrested for larceny-theft during 
1996. The breakdown of persons arrested for larceny-theft was 71 
percent male, 29 percent female, 31 percent juvenile, 54 percent 
black, 45 percent white and less than 1 percent consisting of 
American Indian and Asian. 

Law Enforcement Agencies reported a total value of $87,582,740 stolen 
in larceny- theft offenses. 



NATURE OF LARCENY-THEFTS 



Classification 


Number of 
Offenses 


Percent 
Distribution 






Total 
Value 


Pocket-Picking 


763 


0% 


$ 




232,057 


Purse Snatching 


1,053 


1% 






181,851 


Shoplifting 


25,933 


15% 




4 


200,263 


From Auto 


48,706 


28% 




23 


798,196 


Auto Parts & Access. 


29,924 


17% 




8 


219, 562 


Bicycle 


8,126 


5% 




1 


954,089 


From Building 


27,251 


16% 




20 


369,923 


From Coin Operated 
Machines 


1,148 


1% 






199,054 


All Other 


32,379 


18% 




28 


427,745 


Total 


175,283 


100% 


$ 


87, 


582,740 



LARCENY-THEFT 



Total Number of Larceny-Thefts 



150.000 



^nnil! I rin^pnnnr 



1986 1991 



Larceny-Theft Rate per 100,000 Population 



1.500.0 -f 



500.0 ^ 



I 



n 



r 



n 



h 



n n 



rm 



J J 



1986 



1996 



39 



Larceny-Theft by County 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


1,681 


1,487 


1,638 


1,591 


1,749 


1,629 


Anne Arundel 


14,433 


14,035 


13,281 


13,273 


13,639 


13,732 


Baltimore City 


43,177 


46,750 


43,636 


42,814 


41,836 


43,643 


Baltimore 


26,296 


25,998 


24,678 


23,662 


25,586 


25,244 


Calvert 


971 


932 


841 


774 


750 


854 


Caroline 


606 


424 


439 


328 


399 


439 


Carroll 


2,251 


2,422 


2,238 


2,249 


2,406 


2,313 


Cecil 


1,444 


1,620 


1,242 


1,435 


1,521 


1,452 


Charles 


3,140 


3,258 


3,006 


3,015 


3,304 


3,145 


Dorchester 


873 


743 


834 


875 


815 


828 


Frederick 


3,298 


3,222 


3,166 


2,918 


3,206 


3,162 


Garrett 


387 


363 


383 


449 


359 


388 


Harford 


3,946 


3,851 


3,678 


3,500 


3,666 


3,728 


Howard 


6,345 


6,148 


5,868 


5,350 


5,545 


5,851 


Kent 


230 


321 


248 


278 


306 


277 


Montgomery 


24,449 


24,307 


23,696 


21,878 


22,821 


23,430 


Prince George's 


30,052 


30,856 


28,544 


28,595 


26,914 


28,992 


Queen Anne's 


643 


562 


544 


629 


551 


586 


St. Mary's 


1,656 


1,452 


1,380 


1,424 


1,432 


1,469 


Somerset 


515 


441 


552 


533 


465 


501 


Talbot 


829 


810 


734 


678 


682 


747 


Washington 


2,251 


2,172 


1,984 


1,948 


1,956 


2,062 


Wicomico 


3,341 


3,103 


3,156 


2,842 


2,998 


3,088 


Worcester 


1,909 


1,995 


2,029 


1,921 


1,828 


1,936 


^Statewide Agencies 


560 


814 


773 


484 


502 


627 


State 


175,283 


178,086 


168,568 


163,443 


165,236 


170,123 



* Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

40 



MOTOR 

VEHICLE 

THEFT 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 



Motor vehicle theft is defined as the theft or attempted theft of 
a motor vehicle. 



VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, there were 36,076 motor vehicle thefts reported, this 
represents a .3 percent decrease over 1995. In 1996, there were 
711.3 motor vehicle thefts per 100,000 population. 



ANALYSIS OF MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

During 1996, 78 percent of the motor vehicle thefts were 
automobiles, 19 percent were trucks and buses and 3 percent were 
other motor vehicles. There were 2 6,270 recovered vehicles 
accounting for 73 percent of the total reported stolen. 

In 1996, 4,964 motor vehicle thefts were cleared with 2 8 percent of 
these clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 

A total of 6,162 persons were arrested for motor vehicle theft 
during 1996. A breakdown of persons arrested for motor vehicle 
theft was 90 percent male, 10 percent female, 51 percent juvenile, 
76 percent black, 24 percent white and less than 1 percent 
consisting of American Indian and Asian. 

Law Enforcement Agencies reported a total value $235,498,640 stolen 
in motor vehicle thefts. 



5 YEAR TREND 



5 YEAR 
AVERAGE 



1996 



1995 



1994 



1993 



1992 



Auto 

Truck 

Other 



Total 



29,229 
5,272 
1,505 

36,006 



28,072 
6,780 
1,224 

36,076 



29,276 
5,616 
1,284 

36,176 



31,861 
4,903 
1,430 

38,194 



27,996 
4,294 
1,636 

33,926 



28,938 
4,768 
1,951 

35,657 



42 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

Total Number of Motor Vehicle Thefts 



30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 



Uf^ 



1 ■ 1 ■ — T^ 



r 



^ 



AM 



D 



ih^ 



T 1 i r 



Motor Vehicle Theft Rate per 100,000 Population 



700.0 



n 



m> 



^ n 



u 



i 



m 



43 



Motor Vehicle Theft by County 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


81 


71 


75 


102 


97 


85 


Anne Arundel 


1,797 


1,863 


1,806 


1,854 


2,101 


1,884 


Baltimore City 


11,186 


11,210 


13,603 


10,672 


11,332 


11,601 


Baltimore 


4,751 


5,406 


6,289 


5,477 


5,619 


5,508 


Calvert 


70 


52 


48 


52 


47 


54 


Caroline 


48 


42 


38 


34 


27 


38 


Carroll 


170 


184 


169 


177 


182 


176 


CecU 


140 


176 


160 


167 


199 


168 


Charles 


420 


474 


435 


405 


408 


428 


Dorchester 


74 


68 


47 


55 


54 


60 


Frederick 


239 


267 


258 


261 


241 


253 


Garrett 


19 


35 


32 


20 


25 


26 


Harford 


399 


345 


403 


326 


349 


364 


Howard 


787 


844 


1,157 


1,083 


935 


961 


Kent 


8 


31 


17 


23 


20 


20 


Montgomery 


3,329 


3,388 


3,370 


3,159 


3,134 


3,276 


Prince George's 


11,644 


10,864 


9,477 


9,344 


10,210 


10,308 


Queen Anne's 


57 


60 


39 


59 


40 


51 


St. Mary's 


78 


70 


70 


70 


83 


74 


Somerset 


25 


15 


29 


33 


44 


29 


Talbot 


58 


52 


54 


30 


40 


47 


Washington 


222 


200 


152 


180 


164 


184 


Wicomico 


248 


222 


231 


241 


216 


232 


Worcester 


104 


103 


121 


98 


90 


103 


♦Statewide Agencies 


122 


134 


114 


4 





75 


State 


36,076 


36,176 


38,194 


33,926 


35,657 


36,006 



* Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

44 



ARSON 



ARSON 



Arson is any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with 
or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, 
motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc. 

VOLUME AND RATE 

During 1996, there were 2,509 arsons reported, this represents a 20 
percent decrease over 1995. In 1996, there were 49 arsons per 
100,000 population. Of the total arsons, 43 percent were 
structures, while mobile accounted for 34 percent and other 
property accounted for 23 percent. Residential comprised 61 
percent of the structures at which arson was directed, with 19 
percent of all targeted structural property being uninhabited. The 
estimated value of property damage was approximately 22 million 
dollars . 



In 1996, 430 arsons were cleared with 51 
clearances involving only juvenile offenders. 



percent of these 



A total of 548 persons were arrested for arson during 1996. A 
breakdown of persons arrested for arson was 83 percent male, 17 
percent female, 56 percent juvenile, 3 6 percent black, 63 percent 
white and less than 1 percent consisting of American Indian and 
Asian. 

DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE OF PROPERTY 





Number of 


Percent 


Average 


Percent 


Classification 


Offenses 


Distrib. 


Value 


Cleared 


TOTAL STRUCTURAL 


1 


,083 


43.2 


$ 15,974 


25 


Single Occupancy 












Residence 




459 


18.3 


13,735 


31 


Other Residential 




200 


8.0 


6,645 


23 


Storage 




101 


4.0 


18,178 


18 


Industrial/ 












Manufacturing 




6 


.2 


87,516 


33 


Other Commercial 




113 


4.5 


53,797 


15 


Community/ Public 




145 


5.8 


6,920 


21 


All Other Structures 


59 


2.4 


3,779 


20 


TOTAL MOBILE 




860 


34.3 


5,589 


7 


Motor Vehicle 




816 


32.5 


5,521 


7 


Other Mobile Property 


44 


1.8 


6,862 


16 


OTHER 




566 


22.5 


231 


17 


GRAND TOTAL 


2 


,509 


100 


$ 8,863 


17 



46 



ARSON 



Total Number of Arsons 



4,000 T- 



2,000 
1.500 



- 


- 


































































^ 










w 




; 






'— 




^ 

V 


u 


J 


_ 




' 


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-r 




- 




-r^ 


^ 


_ 


-n 


J 


_ 


S"^ 


- 


- 


- 




- 


— ^T"^ 



Arson Rate per 100,000 Population 



r 



n 



47 



Arson by County 





1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


5 Year 
Average 


Allegany 


17 


22 


12 


13 


16 


16 


Anne Arundel 


156 


154 


141 


146 


174 


154 


Baltimore City 


420 


906 


600 


547 


523 


599 


Baltimore 


404 


420 


458 


396 


408 


417 


Calvert 


13 


10 


17 


13 


9 


12 


Caroline 


12 


18 


13 


11 


10 


13 


Carroll 


47 


40 


53 


42 


34 


43 


Cecil 


31 


27 


20 


28 


67 


35 


Charles 


50 


44 


63 


37 


39 


47 


Dorchester 


14 


14 


5 


13 


7 


11 


Frederick 


47 


63 


67 


59 


72 


62 


Garrett 


10 


6 


9 


3 


5 


7 


Harford 


65 


50 


32 


32 


46 


45 


Howard 


34 


47 


39 


38 


69 


45 


Kent 


6 


6 


4 


3 


4 


5 


Montgomery 


372 


396 


405 


341 


359 


375 


Prince George's 


465 


363 


337 


339 


304 


362 


Queen Anne's 


18 


17 


14 


16 


12 


15 


Somerset 


22 


20 


17 


17 


20 


19 


St. Mary's 


34 


30 


41 


41 


43 


38 


Talbot 


17 


14 


6 


7 


10 


11 


Washington 


83 


94 


69 


49 


60 


71 


Wicomico 


50 


49 


37 


46 


38 


44 


Worcester 


32 


22 


20 


16 


18 


22 


* Statewide Agencies 


90 


287 


170 


143 


163 


171 


State 


2,509 


3,119 


2,649 


2,396 


2,510 


2,637 



Statewide agencies report offenses but do not identify county of occurrence. 

48 



INDEX OFFENSE DATA 



The tables contained within this section were designed to provide 
quick reference to statistical crime information relative to the 
different reporting areas of the State Of Maryland. 

The tables are broken down by Region. Within each Region 
information is listed in County name sequence and is further 
detailed to show the activity experienced by individual police 
agencies. The general identifying descriptions which indicate the 
reporting areas are listed and defined as follows: 



Regional Total - 



This line indicates the total activity 
of all the Counties within the indicated 
Region. 



County Total 



This line indicates the total activity 
of all reporting Agencies within the 
indicated County. 



Sheriff 



This line indicates the total activity 
reported by Sheriff's Offices. This 
includes activity which may have 
occurred within the corporate limits of 
towns in that County. 



County Police 
Department 



This line indicates the total activity 
re-ported by County Police Departments. 
This includes activity which may have 
occurred within the corporate limits of 
towns in that County. 



State Police 



This line indicates the total activity 
reported by all State Police 
installations within the indicated 
reporting area. This includes activity 
which may have occurred within the 
corporate limits of towns in that 
County. 



Municipal - 

Police 

Departments 



This line indicates the total activity 
reported by the specified police 
departments and includes only those 
crimes which were handled by that 
department . 



49 



The five regions used in the Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting 
Program are as follows: 

Region I - Eastern Shore 

Caroline County 
Cecil County 
Dorchester County 
Kent County 
Queen Anne ' s County 
Somerset County 
Talbot County 
Wicomico County 
Worcester County 

Region II - Southern Maryland 

Calvert County 
Charles County 
St. Mary's County 

Region III - Western Maryland 

Allegany County 
Carroll County 
Frederick County 
Garrett County 
Washington County 

Region IV - Washington Metropolitan Region 

Montgomery County 
Prince George ' s County 

Region V - Baltimore Metropolitan Region 

Baltimore City 
Anne Arundel County 
Baltimore County 
Harford County 
Howard County 

Crime Rates for the individual agencies are not calculated in the 
following table because of overlapping jurisdictions in many cities 
of municipal, county and state law enforcement agencies. This 
table contains the offenses as reported by the individual agencies 
with crime rates for the county and region totals. Arson offenses 
in this table are listed opposite the agency reporting the Arson.* 

*Arson figures included are not computed in the total offenses or 
crime rates . 



50 



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87 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 

Crime rates for individual cities and tovms are listed in the following table. The rates 
for many cities are based on combined data reported by municipal, county and state law 
enforcement agencies due to overlapping jurisdiction. 









CRIME 
RATE 


TOTAL 
OFFENSES 


MURDER 


RAPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 


BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 


LARCENY 
THEFT 


M/V 
THEFT 


REGION I 
























CAROLINE COUNTY 




















DENTON 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


4,141.4 

5,901.7 

+42.5 


150 

215 

+ 43.3 








1 


3 
5 


30 
32 


22 
27 


78 
137 


17 
13 


FEDERALSBURG 


1995 
1996 


4,608.5 
6.967.2 


123 
187 




1 






1 



6 

11 


26 
24 


83 
148 


7 
3 




% 


Change 


+ 51.2 


+ 52.0 
















GOLDSBORO 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 



I 

































GREENSBORO 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,164.5 
2,460.2 

111.3 


24 

51 

112.5 








1 




1 


1 

3 


6 
10 


17 
35 




1 


PRESTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 







































RIDGELY 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,276.0 
7,828.9 

+ 48.4 


65 
97 

+ 49.2 











2 


3 
6 


7 
4 


53 
82 


2 
3 


CECIL COUNTY 


CECILTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,800.0 
996.0 
-44.7 


9 
5 

-44.4 














5 

1 


1 
1 


3 
3 






CHARLESTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


264.2 
1,182.7 

+347.7 


2 
9 

+350.0 
















1 



4 


1 
4 


1 



CHESAPEAKE 


CITY 1995 
1996 


1,242.3 
2101.4 


10 

17 















10 


1 
4 


6 
10 


3 
2 




% 


Change 


+ 69.2 


+70.0 
















ELKTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


8,209.3 
7,859.5 

-4.3 


811 
781 
-3.7 




1 


2 
3 


15 
14 


99 
80 


95 

109 


552 
533 


48 
41 


NORTH EAST 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


4,151.1 

5,102.0 

+ 22.9 


89 
110 

+ 23.6 






1 
1 



3 


9 
12 


15 
22 


56 
67 


5 


PERRYVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,171.0 
4,601.0 

-11.0 


127 

113 

-11.0 










2 

3 


15 
16 


29 
13 


74 
69 


7 
12 


PORT DEPOSIT 


1995 
1996 


128.9 
3,205.1 


1 
25 














1 
4 


1 
9 


-1 
10 



2 




% 


Change 


+2,386.5 


+2,400.0 
















RISING SUN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


4,825.5 
7,749.1 

+ 60.6 


65 
105 

+ 61.5 
















1 


8 
17 


55 
84 


2 
3 


DORCHESTER COUNTY 


CAMBRIDGE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,502.6 
8,566.6 

+ 14.2 


882 
1,013 

+ 14.9 





7 
6 


37 
29 


135 
117 


157 
198 


513 
625 


31 
38 


HURLOCK 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


6,092.8 
5,280.7 

-13.3 


109 

95 

-12.8 








2 


2 

1 


9 

10 


22 
22 


64 
55 


12 
5 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 









CRIME 
RATE 


TOTAL 
OFFENSES 


MURDER 


R?iPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 


BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 


LARCEN-/ 
THEFT 


M/V 
THEFT 


KENT COUNTY 


BETTERTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1, 111.1 
555.6 

-50.0 


4 
-50.0 























CHESTERTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,582.1 
3,796.2 

-32.0 


269 

184 

-31.6 






2 



1 

3 


29 


34 


179 
116 


18 

5 


GALENA 




1995 

1996 

Change 


1,169.6 
4,678.4 

+300.0 


4 
16 

+300.0 
















5 






MILLINGTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


3,667.5 

6,112.5 

+ 66.7 


15 

25 

+ 66.7 














1 


7 
12 


9 


'■' 


ROCK HALL 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


3,598.8 
2,522.0 

-29.9 


61 

43 

-29.5 














7 

7 


16 

13 


36 

21 


2 
2 


QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 


BARCLAY 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


588.2 


-100.0 


1 


-100.0 






















1 







CENTREVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


4,177.5 
4,747.8 

+ 13.7 


112 
128 

+ 14.3 




1 






1 
1 




5 


15 
23 


91 

90 


5 

S 


CHURCH HILL 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


207.9 
415.8 

+100.0 


1 
2 

+100.0 



















1 


1 






MILLINGTON 




1995 
1006 

Change 



244.5 




1 























1 






QUEEN ANNE 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 



14.8 




5 




















1 



4 






QUEENSTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


220.8 
1,545.3 

+599.9 


1 
7 

+600.0 










1 









3 



4 






SUDLERSVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,869.2 

1,168.2 

-37.5 


5 
-37.5 














1 







3 






SOMERSET COUNTY 


CRISFIELD 




1995 
1996 

Change 


4,450.5 
5,718.2 

+ 28.5 


130 
168 

+ 29.2 










2 




3 
22 


34 
23 


100 
117 


7 
6 


PRINCESS ANNE 


1995 
1996 


6,339.6 
8,462.9 


146 
196 






2 

4 


2 
8 


9 

11 


33 

41 


84 
124 



8 




% 


Change 


+ 33.5 


+ 34.2 
















Talbot County 


EASTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,608.1 
7,122.9 

-6.4 


841 
792 

-5.8 


1 

4 


4 
4 


12 
29 


99 

55 


133 
117 


560 
549 


32 
34 


OXFORD 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,566.6 
1,558.4 

-0.5 


12 
12 


















2 


10 
9 



1 



89 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 









CRIME 
RATE 


TOTAL 
OFFENSES 


MURDER 


RAPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 


BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 


LARCENY 
THEFT 


M/V 
THEFT 


ST. MICHAEL 


S 
% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


6,666.7 
7,534.7 

+ 13.0 


110 

125 

+ 13.6 






1 




2 

3 


7 
9 


17 
25 


80 
87 


3 
1 


TRAPPE 




1995 

1996 

Change 







































WICOMICO COUNTY 


DELMAR 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


2,487.0 
3,245.7 

+ 30.5 


48 
63 

+ 31.3 






1 

3 


1 
1 


4 
10 


12 
14 


28 

34 


1 


FRUITLAND 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,063.0 

7,148.3 

+ 1.2 


278 
283 

+ 1.8 






4 

5 


7 


55 
59 


60 
47 


132 
144 


24 

21 


HEBRON 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 



150.4 




1 




















1 










MARDELA SPRINGS 1995 
1996 








































% 


Change 


- 


- 
















PITTSVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 







































SALISBURY 


^ 


1995 

1996 

Change 


13,777.2 

13,451.3 

-2.4 


3,081 
3,026 


2 

1 


28 

17 


155 
122 


279 

331 


604 
584 


1,867 
1,819 


146 
152 


SHARPTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 






































WILLARDS 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 






































WORCESTER COUNTY 


BERLIN 




1995 

1996 

Change 


4,003.9 
3,074.4 

-23.2 


123 
95 

-22.8 






6 

3 


4 

1 


12 
13 


25 
13 


76 
62 



3 


OCEAN CITY 


% 


1995 
1997 

Change 


24,894.0 

25,621.0 

+2.9 


1,644 
1,702 

+3.5 


1 

1 


7 
4 


21 
19 


77 
51 


244 
325 


1,235 
1,250 


59 
52 


POCOMOKE CITY 


1995 
1996 


5,703.6 
6,101.6 


289 
311 






2 

1 


7 
10 


11 
43 


28 
53 


233 
192 


8 
12 




% 


Change 


+7.0 


+7.6 
















SNOW HILL 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,755.6 
1,282.5 

-26.9 


49 

36 

-26.5 














5 


1 
1 


45 
30 


1 



REGION II 
























CALVERT COUNTY 
























CHESAPEAKE BEACH 1995 
1996 


3,911.8 
4,119.9 


94 
99 












12 
13 


17 
17 


58 
66 


4 

3 




% 


Change 


+ 5.3 


+ 5.3 
















NORTH BEACH 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,310.3 
4,458.2 

-16.0 


77 
65 

-15.6 






2 








12 
8 


17 
18 


39 
32 


7 
7 



90 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 









CRIME 
RATE 


TOTAL 
OFFENSES 


MURDER 


RAPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 


BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 


LARCENY 
THEFT 


M/V 
THEFT 


CHARLES COUNTY 


INDIAN HEAD 


% 


1995 

1996 

Chanqe 


3,030.3 

3,710.0 

+ 22.4 


107 

131 

+ 22.4 


1 








1.. 








LA PLATA 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,523.1 
6,026.4 

+ 9.1 


378 
352 
-6.9 


1 



1 

2 


18 
12 


21 
29 


55 
73 


249 
215 


33 
21 


ST. MARY'S COUNTY 


LEONARDTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


13,063.1 
11,772.2 

-9.9 


203 
184 

-9.4 



1 


1 



6 



18 
28 


46 

41 


130 
110 


2 
4 


REGION III 
























ALLEGANY COUNTY 






















BARTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 






































CUMBERLAND 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


5,653.9 
6,021.1 

+ 6.5 


1,361 
1,458 
+ 7.1 






7 
10 


12 
9 


257 
189 


201 
249 


851 
960 


33 

41 


FROSTBURG 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


3,788.6 

4,644.4 

+ 22.6 


296 

365 

+ 23.3 




1 


4 
3 






9 
22 


39 
53 


237 
281 


7 
5 


LONACONING 




1995 
1996 

Change 


654.8 
279.1 
-57.4 


7 

3 

-57.1 




1 










1 



1 


5 
1 


1 



LUKE 




1995 
1996 

Change 


1,234.6 


-100.0 



-100.0 






















1 



1 



MIDLAND 




1995 
1996 

Change 






































WESTERNPORT 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,877.9 
2,546.7 

+ 35.6 


44 

60 

+ 36.4 










1 



2 

4 


15 
21 


25 
34 


1 
1 


CARROLL COUNTY 


HAMPSTEAD 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


2,633.2 
3,990.0 

+ 51.5 


84 

128 

+ 52.4 






1 






3 


3 
6 


10 
22 


63 
89 


« 


MANCHESTER 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,582.6 

1,606.0 

+ 1.5 


48 

49 

+ 2.1 














1 






47 
40 




1 


NEW WINDSOR 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


2,348.6 

1,968.0 

-16.2 


19 
16 

-15.8 










1 
1 


1 
3 


4 
2 


12 
10 


1 




SYKESVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


2,279.8 
2,612.4 

+ 14.6 


59 

68 

+ 15.3 












2 


5 
3 


9 
16 


39 
42 


6 

5 


TANEYTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


4,823.5 

3,462.0 

-28.2 


205 

148 

-27.8 






3 



4 
2 


9 

17 


39 
19 


139 
100 


11 

10 


UNION BRIDGE 




1995 
1996 

Change 


1,209.7 

1,103.3 

-8.8 


12 
11 














1 


1 
4 


10 
5 







91 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 



CRIME 


TOTAL 


MURDER 


RAPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 


BREAKING OR 


LARCENY 


M/V 


RATE 


OFFENSES 








ASSAULT 


ENTERING 


THEFT 


THEFT 



WESTMINSTER 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,861.2 

7,175.9 

-8.7 


1,149 

1,055 

-8.2 






3 

3 


18 
26 


43 

57 


163 
150 


871 
779 


51 

40 




FREDERICK COUNTY 


BRUNSWICK 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


2,600.4 

2,261.9 

-13.0 


136 

119 
-12.5 






1 

4 


1 
1 


5 
1 


27 
33 


99 
75 


3 
5 




BURKITTSVILLE 


1995 
1996 



497.5 



1 



















1 














% 


Change 


- 


- 


















EMMITSBURG 




1995 
1996 

Change 


455.2 

2,163.0 

+375.2 


9 

43 

+377.8 







2 




1 


1 
1 


2 
4 


5 
34 






FREDERICK 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


5,523.3 
5,806.0 

+ 5.1 


2,594 

2,743 

+ 5.7 


3 

1 


18 
17 


116 
106 


376 
586 


350 
279 


1,597 
1,637 


134 

117 




MIDDLETOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,581.2 

2,181.0 

+ 37.9 


29 

40 

+ 37.9 






1 







2 

1 


5 
9 


20 
29 






*MT. AIRY 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


3,887.4 

3,994.6 

+ 2.8 


145 
149 

+2.8 









2 


3 
2 


7 
7 


19 
32 


112 
96 


4 
10 




MYERSVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,077.6 
2,155.2 

+100.0 


5 
10 

+100.0 








1 


1 








3 


4 

6 








NEW MARKET 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,219.5 
2,134.1 

+75.0 


4 

7 

+75.0 



















2 



2 
7 








THURMONT 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


4,473.2 
4,679.2 

+ 4.6 


152 

159 

+4.6 








3 


1 




12 
30 


32 
25 


101 
96 


6 

5 




WALKERSVILLE 




1995 

1996 

Change 


1,158.0 
1,616.4 

+ 39.6 


48 
67 

+ 39.6 














2 
2 


7 
12 


37 
52 


2 

1 




WOODSBORO 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,559.5 
2,729.0 

+75.0 


8 
14 

+ 75.0 






1 








1 
1 


1 
9 


4 
4 


1 





GARRETT COUNTY 


ACCIDENT 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


859.6 

2,865.3 

+233.3 


3 
10 

+233.3 


















1 
1 


2 
9 








DEER PARK 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


477.3 


-100.0 


2 



-100.0 






















2 









FRIENDSVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


2,253.0 

1,213.2 

-46.2 


13 

7 

-46.2 















1 




3 

2 


9 

5 








GRANTSVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


3,373.0 
4,347.8 

+28.9 


17 

22 

+ 29.4 


1 











1 






1 
9 


13 
11 


1 




KITZMILLER 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


2,545.5 


-100.0 


7 



-100.0 


















4 



3 










* Although Mt . Airy lies in Carroll, Frederick and Howard Counties, for purposes of this 
report we have shown the data for the entire City in Frederick County 



92 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 









CRIME 
RATE 


TOTAL 
OFFENSES 


MURDER 


RAPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 


BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 


LARCEN-/ 
THEFT 


M/V 
THEFT 


LOCHLYNN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


3,253.8 

1,518.4 

-53.3 


15 
7 

-53.3 














2 



5 
3 


8 
4 






MT. LAKE PARK 


1995 
1996 


1,290.0 
2.115.6 


25 
41 










[J 



1 




- 






* 


Change 


+ 64.0 


+ 64.0 
















OAKLAND 




1995 
1996 

Change 


2.687.3 

2,004.1 

-25.4 


52 

39 

-25.0 










c 


] 


^ 


11 




WASHINGTON COUNTY 


BOONSBORO 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,225.9 
2,011.0 

+ 64.0 


40 

66 

+ 65.0 






1 






1 


6 


9 


47 


^ 


CLEAR SPRING 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


1,445.8 
963.9 

-33.3 


6 
4 

-33.3 















1 


4 



2 
3 






FUNKSTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,232.4 

1,144.4 

-7.1 


14 

13 
-7.1 












1 


2 


7 
3 


5 
5 


^ 


HAGERSTOWN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,530.3 
5,331.1 

-3.6 


2,145 
2,080 

-3.0 


2 




14 

15 


57 

68 


226 


341 
372 


1,382 
1,301 


123 
137 


HANCOCK 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,909.8 
3,070.7 

+ 60.8 


47 

76 

+ 61.7 














11 

10 


6 

13 


25 
50 


5 
3 


KEEDYSVILLE 




1995 
1996 

Change 


2,586.2 

1,508.6 

-41.7 


12 

7 

-41.7 














2 




7 

3 


3 
4 






SHARPSBURG 




1995 
1996 

Change 


1,517.5 
2,883.2 

+ 90.0 


10 

19 

+ 90.0 












1 






1 



7 
16 


2 
2 


SMITHSBURG 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


1,629.9 
1,359.1 

-16.6 


31 
26 

-16.1 






1 








5 
3 


5 
3 


20 

18 



2 


WILLIAMSPORT 


% 


1995 

1996 

Change 


2,690.9 
2,747.7 

+ 2.1 


74 

76 

+ 2.7 










1 




6 
6 


17 
24 


46 
42 


4 
4 


REGION IV 
























MONTGOMERY COUNTY 




















CHEVY CHASE 


IV 
% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


598.1 
74.8 

-87.5 


16 
2 

-87.5 






















15 

1 


1 
1 


CHEVY CHASE 
VILLAGE 




1995 
1996 

Change 


13,000.0 
11,069.7 

-14.8 


104 

89 

-14.4 










2 







14 
13 


74 
75 


14 
1 


GAITHERSBURG 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


3,066.3 

3,867.3 

+ 26.1 


1,336 
1,695 

+ 26.9 


1 




13 
8 


33 
43 


62 
92 


127 
162 


989 
1,269 


111 
121 


GARRETT PARK 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,357.5 
373.1 

-72.5 


12 
3 

-75.0 


















11 




1 
3 






KENSINGTON 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


1,692.5 
642.1 

-62.1 


29 

11 
-62.1 















1 




1 




26 

10 


1 
1 



93 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 



• CRIME TOTAL MURDER RAPE ROBBERY AGGRAVATED BREAKING OR 
RATE OFFENSES ASSAULT ENTERING 

POOLESVILLE 1995 263.4 10 10 
1996 105.4 4 000 040 
% Change -60.0 -60.0 ^ ^ ^ 

ROCKVILLE 1995 3,511.5 1,665 8 61 65 241 1,179 111 
1996 3,230.7 1,541 5 40 37 227 1,128 104 
% Change -8.0 -7.4 

SOMERSET 1995 302.1 3 00 30 
1996 201.4 2 000 0:0 
% Change -33.3 -33.3 

**TAKOMA PARK 1995 6,434.9 1,157 1 8 112 42 215 619 160 
1996 6,292.2 1,138 3 8 112 31 159 609 216 
% Change -2.2 -1.6 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 

BERWYN HEIGHTS 1995 7,140.3 199 1 1 8 8 35 132 14 

1996 6,564.4 184 2 6 5 22 135 14 

% Change -8.1 -7.5 

BLADENSBURG 1995 13,661.1 1,081 2 2 85 51 192 517 232 
1996 12,701.0 1,011 4 5 96 55 192 458 201 
% Change -7.0 -6.5 

BOWIE 1995 2,945.0 1,107 1 3 27 67 201 725 83 
1996 3,463.8 1,302 5 32 66 257 838 104 
% Change +17.6 +17.6 

BRENTWOOD 1995 6,888.1 224 2 18 17 62 74 51 
1996 6,817.5 223 22 16 53 86 46 
% Change -1.0 -0.4 

CAPITOL HGTS . . 1995 10,430.2 400 4 30 28 55 179 104 

1996 9,930.0 383 8 3 35 29 51 157 100 

% Change -4.8 -4.3 

CHEVERLY 1995 7,483.5 488 3 35 19 55 281 95 

1996 5,930.8 389 1 2 33 13 39 204 97 

% Change -20.7 -20.3 

COLLEGE PARK 1995 11,093.0 2,382 2 6 58 78 396 1,660 182 

1996 10,717.6 2,315 2 7 59 94 357 1,542 254 

% Change -3.4 -2.8 

COLMAR MANOR 1995 6,740.8 103 1 14 12 18 50 8 

1996 5,660.4 87 2 11 5 19 44 6 

% Change -16.0 -15.5 

COTTAGE CITY 1995 8,508.8 101 5 8 30 47 11 

1996 8,877.7 106 12 4 12 58 20 

% Change +4.3 +5.0 

DISTRICT HGTS. 1995 4,996.5 356 1 5 40 19 63 146 82 

1996 3,948.7 283 3 21 18 58 128 55 

% Change -21.0 -20.5 

EAGLE HARBOR 1995 2,631.6 1 1 

1996 00 000 000 

% Change -100.0 -100.0 

EDMONSTON 1995 13,532.7 172 3 5 32 105 27 

1996 11,032.9 141 7 9 20 86 19 

% Change -18.5 -18.0 

FAIRMOUNT HGTS. 1995 11,576.8 174 1 1 13 20 42 53 44 

1996 13,633.4 206 1 5 18 18 58 52 56 

% Change +17.8 +18.4 

** Although Takoma Park lies in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties, for the purpose 
of this report, we have shown the data for the entire City in Montgomery County. 



94 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 



FOREST HGTS. 1995 7,974.6 226 1 3 20 1 "1 ■'.'. r.r 35 

1996 8,666.7 247 1 12 r, 'j^ _ •. 50 



GLEN ARDEN 


, 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,224.2 

5,586.5 

-22.7 


387 

301 

-22.2 


1 
1 




2'. 


•10 


- 


;•'. - 


',1: 
',■. 


GREENBELT 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,311.0 

7,649.0 

+ 4.6 


1,525 
1,605 

+ 5.2 


1 


9 

9 


59 
89 


55 
51 


i^-' 


:■/:■ 


2ii 


HYATTSVILLE 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


7,843.7 
7,851.7 

+ 0.1 


1,148 
1,156 

+ 0.7 







4 
2 


71 
95 


41 
19 


170 
156 


729 
748 


133 
136 


LANDOVER HILLS 1995 
1996 


4,628.5 
5,148.4 


76 
85 






1 
1 


2 


5 
3 


IJ 
11 


54 

L5 


I'i 



1995 6,551.0 1,423 2 4 85 41 174 967 

1996 6,471.1 1,414 12 75 58 151 961 



MORNINGSIDE 1995 8,800.0 88 

1996 8,258.7 83 

% Change -6.2 -5.7 



MT. RAINIER 1995 9,540.2 749 1 2 74 44 111 401 116 

1996 9,687.2 765 2 78 37 104 345 199 

% Change +1.5 +2.1 

NEW CARROLLTON 1995 5,990.7 719 11 61 42 86 352 167 

1996 5,465.8 656 4 50 33 66 283 220 

% Change -8.8 -8.8 

NORTH BRENTWOOD 1995 6,250.0 32 2 6 8 14 2 

1996 6,640.6 34 1 1 1 10 11 IC 



% Change 



RIVERDALE 1995 10,104.4 513 8 45 31 90 292 47 

1996 8,517.7 435 6 41 28 99 198 63 



SEAT PLEASANT 1995 7,147.9 405 
1996 6,860.9 391 



UNIVERSITY PARK 1995 3,753.4 84 4 3 30 

1996 5,197.7 117 3 1 26 



% Change +38.5 +39.3 



UPPER MARLBORO 1995 9,196.9 71 2 10 46 13 

1996 5,927.8 46 1 1 8 28 8 



% Change 



REGION V 
BALTIMORE CITY 



BALTIMORE CITY 1995 13,513.3 96,243 

1996 12,399.1 88,833 

% Change -8.2 -7.7 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 



1995 8,424.4 2,984 2 18 177 242 512 1,896 

1996 8,523.5 3,037 4 12 205 277 613 1,75C 



95 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 









CRIME 
RATE 


TOTAL 
OFFENSES 


MURDER 


RAPE 


ROBBERY 


AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 


BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 


LARCENY 
THEFT 


M/V 
THEFT 


HARFORD COUNTY 


ABERDEEN 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


6,861.4 
6,439.8 

-6.1 


930 
878 

-5.6 


- 1 
1 


12 

3 


25 
26 


90 
57 


107 
130 




653 
622 


42 
39 


BEL AIR 


% 


1995 
1996 

Change 


5,065.1 
6,269.3 

+23.8 


506 
630 

+ 24.5 






2 


8 
8 


4 
7 


65 




403 
519 


24 
23 


HAVRE DE 


GRACE 1995 

1996 

% Change 


4,192.0 
4,298.7 

+2.5 


413 
426 

+ 3.1 




1 


6 
2 


12 
15 


36 
49 


74 
84 




247 
251 


38 
24 



96 



MARYLAND 
ARREST DATA 



ARREST DATA 



The Mairyland Uniform Crime Reporting Program requires the submission 
of monthly reports of persons arrested in the state. A record of 
arrest activity for both Part I and Part II crimes are received from 
state, county and municipal law enforcement agencies showing the age, 
sex and race of persons arrested. Traffic arrests, except Driving 
While Intoxicated, are not reported. A total of 275,473 arrests for 
Part I and Part II criminal offenses were reported during 1996. In 

1995, there were 286,831 arrests which represents a 4 percent 
decrease. Based on 1996 population estimates, there were 5,431.3 
arrests per 100,000 population in Maryland. The arrest rate for 1995 
was 5,688.8 representing a 5 percent decrease in the arrest rate. 

A person is counted on the monthly arrest report each time they are 
arrested. This means that a person may be arrested several times 
during a given month and would be counted each time. However, a 
person is counted only once each time regardless of the number of 
crimes or charges involved. A juvenile is counted as "arrested" when 
the circumstances are such that, if the juvenile were an adult, an 
arrest would have been counted or when police or other official 
action is taken beyond a mere interview, warning or admonishment. 

Arrest figures do not indicate the niimber of individuals arrested or 
summonsed since, as stated above, one person may be arrested several 
times during the month. However, arrest information is useful in 
measuring the extent of law enforcement activities in a given 
geographic area as well as providing an index for measuring the 
involvement in criminal acts by the age, sex and race of 
perpetrators . 

During 1996, 22 percent of all reported arrests were for Crime Index 
Offenses, the same as 1995. Analysis of Crime Index Arrest Data 
indicates that larceny-theft comprised the highest percentage of all 
arrests for Crime Index offenses, with 51 percent of the total in 

1996, compared to 52 percent in 1995. The drug abuse, other assaults, 
driving under the influence and disorderly conduct categories 
continue to record the highest percentage of arrests for Part II 
offenses. These offenses accounted for 47 percent of the total 
arrests for Part II offenses in 1996. 

5 YEAR TREND 

5 YEAR 
AVERAGE 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 

Juvenile 47,646 54,965 50,277 48,528 42,767 41,694 
Adult 227,702 220,508 236,554 225,966 228,034 227,450 



TOTAL 275,348 275,473 286,831 274,494 270,801 269,144 



98 



VIOLENT CRIME ARRESTS 

Arrests for crimes of violence accounted for 23 percent of the total 
arrests for Crime Index Offenses and 5 percent of the total arrests in 
1996 compared to 22 and 5 percent respectively in 1995. 

A further evaluation indicates that arrests for robbery and aggravated 
assault represented the highest percentage of the total arrests for 
violent crimes with 32 and 58 percent, respectively. 



PROPERTY CRIME ARRESTS 

Property Crime arrests represented 77 percent of all arrests for Crime 
Index Offenses and 16 percent of the total arrests in 1996, compared to 
78 and 17 percent respectively in 1995. 

The highest percentage of property crime arrests, 67 percent, continues 
to occur in the larceny- theft category. 



DRUG ABUSE VIOLATION ARRESTS 

Information pertaining to drug abuse violation arrests is collected 
according to specific drug categories and whether the arrest was for 
sale or manufacture or possession of a specific drug. During 1996, a 
total of 36,628 arrests for drug abuse law violations were reported 
compared to 1995 with 44,323 arrests, resulting in a 17 percent 
decrease . 

Evaluation of the reported data discloses that 42 percent of all persons 
arrested for drug abuse violations were under 21 years of age and 24 
percent were under 18 years of age in 1996 compared to 33 and 17 percent 
respectively in 1995. 

Analysis of individual categories showed that the highest percentage of 
arrests, which involved opium or cocaine and derivatives, was 53 percent 
in 1996 and 59 percent in 1995. Drug abuse arrest, for marijuana 
increased to 40 percent in 1996 from 32 percent in 1995. Of the total 
drug abuse arrests 66 percent were for possession while 34 percent were 
for sale or manufacture in 1996, compared to 61 and 39 percent 
respectively in 1995. 



Possession of marijuana increased to 34 percent 
arrests in 1996, from 26 percent in 1995. 
cocaine and derivatives represented 26 percent 
arrests in 1996, compared to 27 percent in 19 
manufacture of marijuana amounted to 6 percent 
arrests in 1996, the same as in 1995. Sale or 
cocaine and derivatives decreased to 27 percent 
arrests in 1996, from 32 percent in 1995. 



of the total drug abuse 
Possession of opium or 
of the total drug abuse 
95. Arrests for sale or 
of the total drug abuse 
manufacture of opium or 
of the total drug abuse 



To aid in the study of drug arrests a chart by county is provided. 



99 



5 YEAR TREND 





5 YEAR 














AVERAGE 


1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


Total 


37,317 


36,628 


44,323 


38,054 


35,744 


31,835 


Sales /Manu- 


14,234 


12,323 


17,397 


14,857 


13,870 


12,723 


facture 














Opiiim/ 


11, 678 


9,814 


14,156 


12,308 


11,509 


10,603 


cocaine 














Marijuana 


1,926 


2,165 


2,646 


1,878 


1,560 


1,379 


Synthetic 


288 


119 


248 


292 


413 


370 


Other 


342 


225 


347 


379 


388 


371 


Possession 


23,083 


24,305 


26,926 


23,197 


21,874 


19,112 


Opium/ 


11,031 


9,480 


12,099 


11,345 


11,658 


10,574 


Cocaine 














Marijuana 


9,376 


12,508 


11, 661 


9,250 


7,200 


6,262 


Synthetic 


467 


191 


484 


451 


646 


562 


Other 


2,209 


2,126 


2,682 


2,151 


2,370 


1,714 



GAMBLING ARREST 

A total of 227 Gambling arrests were reported during 1996. In 1995, 
211 persons were arrested for Gambling violations resulting in an 8 
percent increase. 

Arrests for Gambling offenses amounted to .1 percent of all reported 
Part I and Part II arrests in 1996, the same as in 1995. Persons 
under the age of 18 made up 35 percent of all Gambling arrests 
compared to 28 percent in 1995. 

5 YEAR TREND 





5 


YEAR 














AVERAGE 


1996 


1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


Bookmaking 




11 


10 


5 


12 


13 


13 


Numbers 




16 


10 


32 


29 


3 


4 


Other 




231 


207 


174 


223 


352 


201 


Total 




258 


227 


211 


264 


368 


218 



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106 



ARRESTS 



RACE 



CLASSIFICATION 
OF OFFENSES 



BLACK AMEPICAJ^I 

iriLiAt: 



MURDER & NONNEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

MANSLAUGHTER BY NEGLIGENCE 

FORCIBLE RAPE 

ROBBERY 

FELONIOUS ASSAULT 

BREAKING OR ENTERING 

LARCENY-THEFT 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

OTHER ASSAULTS 

ARSON 

FORGERY & COUNTERFEITING 

FRAUD 

EMBEZZLEMENT 

STOLEN PROPERTY; BUYING, 
RECEIVING, POSSESSING 



VANDALISM 

WEAPONS; CARRYING, 
POSSESSING, ETC. 

PROSTITUTION & COMMERCIALIZED 
VICE 

SEX OFFENSES (EXCEPT FORCIBLE 
RAPE, PROSTITUTION & VICE) 

DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS 

GAMBLING 

OFFENSES AGAINST FAMILY 
AND CHILDREN 

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE 

LIQUOR LAWS 

DISORDERLY CONDUCT 

VAGRANCY 

ALL OTHER OFFENSES {EXCEPT 
TRAFFIC) 

SUSPICION 

CURFEW & LOITERING 
LAW VIOLATIONS 



598 

18 

680 

4, 170 

6,372 

7,804 

21,474 

5,539 

27,460 

454 

695 

1,944 

338 

346 

3,786 
4,196 

669 

1,432 



47 

3 

7 

292 

1, 686 

954 

8,974 

623 

8,084 

94 

351 

1,649 

213 

58 

713 
380 



31,341 


5 


287 


220 




7 


1,851 




381 


19,613 


3 


766 


4,199 


1 


100 


4,476 


1 


242 


384 




70 


70,552 


15 


303 


307 




49 


556 




46 



RUN- AWAY S 



GRAND TOTAI. 



53,438 



12 


9 


236 


449 


857 


3,591 


3,316 


4,674 


4,288 


4,396 


13,702 


16,481 


1,490 


4,658 


16,397 


18,929 


346 


198 


504 


534 


2,337 


1,215 


269 


277 


133 


268 


2,587 


1,885 


1,556 


2,980 


866 


776 


819 


788 


13,020 


23,496 


32 


195 


1,211 


1,007 


18,605 


4,517 


3,951 


1,326 


2, 644 


3,053 


126 


327 


43,568 


41,568 


115 


237 


155 


446 


1,096 


341 


134,319 


139,184 





1 

7 

50 

62 

216 

13 

164 

3 

8 

36 

3 

3 

22 
35 

9 

11 



26 


86 








2 


12 


14 


243 


1 


21 


4 


17 





1 


61 


658 





4 





1 


1 


9 


273 


1,697 



107 



ARRESTS 



CLASSIFICATION 
OF OFFENSES 



9 & 10- 
UNDER 12 



13- 
14 



17 JUVENILE 
TOTAL 



AGE 
19 



MURDER Sc NONNEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

MANSLAUGHTER 
BY NEGLIGENCE 

FORCIBLE RAPE 

ROBBERY 

FELONIOUS ASSAULT 

BREAKING OR ENTERING 

LARCENY-THEFT 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

OTHER ASSAULTS 

ARSON 

FORGERY & COUNTERFEITING 

FRAUD 

EMBEZZLEMENT 

STOLEN PROPERTY; BUYING, 
RECEIVING, POSSESSING 

VANDALISM 

WEAPONS; CARRYING, 
POSSESSING, ETC. 

PROSTITUTION & 
COMMERCIALIZED VICE 

SEX OFFENSES (EXCEPT 
FORCIBLE RAPE, 
PROSTITUTION & VICE 

DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS 

GAMBLING 

OFFENSES AGAINST 
FAMILY AND CHILDREN 

DRIVING UNDER THE 
INFLUENCE 






1 


24 


30 


43 


53 


151 


50 


59 


34 


42 


29 


26 

















1 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 





1 


5 


31 


16 


26 


41 


121 


40 


43 


24 


27 


21 


16 


5 


107 


341 


353 


388 


394 


1,588 


301 


228 


186 


129 


140 


123 


91 


246 


538 


400 


430 


449 


2,154 


327 


327 


274 


256 


228 


228 


94 


345 


903 


570 


555 


515 


2,982 


428 


395 


254 


235 


202 


173 


242 


1,162 


2,650 


1,747 


1,847 


1,820 


9,468 


1,229 


1,026 


797 


789 


681 


700 


9 


119 


757 


711 


747 


776 


3,119 


422 


329 


224 


158 


120 


145 


284 


1,165 


2,230 


1,445 


1,435 


1,510 


8,069 


926 


1,019 


970 


978 


924 


968 


37 


65 


112 


48 


21 


26 


309 


23 


20 


14 


8 


10 


8 


2 





4 


15 


28 


29 


78 


49 


49 


52 


36 


44 


42 


1 


4 


10 


10 


18 


34 


77 


59 


84 


110 


127 


115 


124 








4 


4 


11 


19 


38 


34 


29 


20 


25 


21 


28 





5 


23 


14 


20 


22 


84 


21 


21 


24 


19 


17 


18 


150 


412 


739 


424 


406 


419 


2,550 


199 


132 


115 


86 


86 


75 


17 


90 


322 


369 


329 


328 


1,455 


286 


254 


180 


197 


172 


173 





1 


2 


3 


4 


18 


28 


14 


29 


40 


29 


39 


49 


30 


110 


134 


60 


44 


47 


425 


40 


41 


35 


41 


33 


36 



3 136 
2 
5 8 



1,239 1,606 2,420 3,397 
11 13 22 32 
28 14 15 13 



JOl 2,613 2,242 1,801 1,540 1,307 1,180 
80 14 14 14 9 8 10 
83 17 28 27 45 44 59 



62 



150 



381 



185 



537 



750 



673 



799 



LIQUOR LAWS 


1 


13 


108 


209 


410 


655 


1,396 


776 


686 


532 


167 


116 


101 


DISORDERLY CONDUCT 


17 


132 


411 


379 


430 


498 


1,867 


267 


213 


184 


196 


159 


148 


VAGRANCY 


3 


6 


1 


2 


3 


20 


35 


30 


16 


19 


17 


10 


16 


ALL OTHER OFFENSES 


126 


519 


1,684 


1,497 


1,846 


1,928 


7,600 


2,261 


2,903 


3,062 


3,114 


3,025 


3,051 


(EXCEPT TRAFFIC) 




























SUSPICION 


2 


11 


35 


29 


27 


31 


135 


25 


15 


11 


6 


11 


11 


CURFEW & LOITERING 


1 


14 


99 


128 


185 


175 


602 














LAW VIOLATIONS 





























RUN-AWAYS 



GRAND TOTAL 



1,141 4,771 12,855 10,508 12,074 13,616 54,965 10,833 10,688 9,541 9,026 8,236 8,307 



108 



ARRESTS 













A 


G 


E 














A G 


E 




















CLASSIF 


CAT 


ON 


2- 








2S- 


30- 


35 


39 


40 


-44 


45- 


49 


50 


-54 


55 


59 


60 


64 


65 £■ 


ADULT 


TOTAL 


OF 


OFFENSES 












2 9 


3.1 


























O'/EP 


TOTAL 





MURDER & NONNEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

MANSLAUGHTER BY 
NEGLIGENCE 

FORCIBLE RAPE 

ROBBERY 

FELONIOUS ASSAULT 

BREAKING OR ENTERING 

LARCENY-THEFT 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

OTHER ASSAULTS 

ARSON 

FORGERY &. COUNTERFEITING 

FRAUD 

EMBEZZLEMENT 

STOLEN PROPERTY; BUYING, 
RECEIVING, POSSESSING 

VANDALISM 

WEAPONS; CARRYING, 
POSSESSING, ETC. 

PROSTITUTION & 
COMMERCIALIZED VICE 

SEX OFFENSES (EXCEPT 
FORCIBLE RAPE, 
PROSTITUTION & VICE) 

DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS 

GAMBLING 

OFFENSES AGAINST FAMILY 
AND CHILDREN 



29 


92 


96 


82 


37 


35 


9 


4 


6 


5 


566 


687 


102 


632 


523 


287 


151 


46 


17 


6 


3 





2,874 


4,462 


254 


1,033 


1,041 


781 


516 


292 


154 


75 


51 


67 


5,904 


8,058 


213 


1,018 


1,194 


884 


467 


190 


65 


33 


10 


15 


5,776 


8,758 


721 


3,929 


4,112 


3,386 


1,893 


958 


403 


178 


87 


91 


20,980 


30,448 


139 


523 


415 


285 


156 


66 


32 


15 


7 


7 


3,043 


6,162 


,103 


5,035 


5,537 


4,427 


2,737 


1,411 


699 


340 


198 


203 


27,475 


35,544 


11 


20 


50 


40 


15 


8 


6 


3 


2 


1 


239 


548 


43 


200 


185 


136 


68 


40 


10 


7 


5 


2 


968 


1,046 


136 


762 


688 


552 


353 


206 


91 


53 


29 


27 


3,516 


3,593 


17 


95 


91 


72 


42 


18 


16 


2 


2 


1 


513 


551 


8 


60 


56 


32 


24 


9 


7 





2 


2 


320 


404 


67 


369 


333 


234 


120 


76 


27 


13 


11 


6 


1,949 


4,499 


139 


549 


440 


303 


174 


131 


55 


40 


14 


14 


3,121 


4,576 


50 


360 


389 


314 


156 


78 


32 


16 


16 


16 


1,627 


1,655 


40 


223 


219 


185 


104 


76 


44 


25 


19 


33 


1,194 


1,619 



4,851 4,469 3,464 1,862 871 342 105 

25 13 10 3 6 6 3 

422 540 411 243 133 74 22 



24 27,827 36,628 

147 227 

12 2,149 2,232 



DRIVING UNDER THE 
INFLUENCE 


846 


3,956 


4,218 


3,808 


2,620 


1,718 


1,115 


593 


342 


LIQUOR LAWS 


77 


340 


346 


293 


198 


112 


71 


38 


32 


DISORDERLY CONDUCT 


132 


628 


624 


521 


346 


211 


110 


58 


29 


VAGRANCY 


15 


64 


83 


72 


39 


17 


12 


7 


1 


ALL OTHER OFFENSES 
(EXCEPT TRAFFIC) 


3,279 


15,294 


15,140 


12,107 


7,075 


3,940 


2,054 


950 


530 


SUSPICION 


16 


40 


30 


22 


18 


11 


2 





1 



316 



23,157 23,379 



18 3,903 5,299 

25 3,851 5,718 

1 419 454 

470 78,255 85,855 



221 



CURFEW & LOITERING 
LAW VIOLATIONS 



356 
602 



6BAND TOTAL 



40,610 40,878 32,758 19,449 10,671 5,459 2.590 1,462 1,359 220,508 275,473 



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181 



LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 



One law enforcement officers died in the line of duty in Maryland 
during 1996. The following summary is based on information provided 
by their Agencies and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The 
Federal Bureau of Investigation conducts in depth investigations of 
these tragic incidents in which law enforcement officers have made 
the supreme sacrifice in the perfoirmance of their duties. 



February 12, 1996 

A Corporal with the Charles County Sheriff's Office was fatally 
injured in the line of duty as a result of a motor vehicle accident. 
The 17 year veteran was a member of the Sheriff's Office motorcycle 
unit and was responding to a call when he collided with a van that 
drove into his path. 



182 



LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSAULTED 



The following information is based on a detailed monthly collection 
of data in the Uniform Crime Reporting System regarding the problem 
of assaults on local, county and state law enforcement officers. The 
large number of reported assaults on sworn officers is in part due to 
a prevalent attitude of disrespect for law enforcement in certain 
elements of our society. 

A total of 4,192 law enforcement officers in Maryland were victims of 
assault in the line of duty during 1996, compared to 4,425 assaults 
during 1995 resulting in a 5 percent decrease. 

The rate of assaults on law enforcement officers for the state was 
31 assaults per every 100 sworn officers in 1996, compared to 33 in 
1995. 

Physical force was used in 83 percent of all assaults on police 
officers . 

The greatest number of assaults, 3 percent, occurred while officers 
were responding to disturbance calls (family disputes, man with a 
gun, etc.), 29 percent of assaults on police officers occurred 
between 10:00 P.M. and 2:00 A.M. 

A total of 4,081 assaults on law enforcement officers were cleared 
during 1996 amounting to a 97 percent clearance rate. 









5 YEAR 


TREND 














INJURY 


VS 


NON- INJURY 








5 YEAR 
AVERAGE 


1996 




1995 


1994 


1993 


1992 


No Personal 
Injury 




3,552 


3,536 




3,732 


3,447 


3,317 


3,729 


Personal 
Injury 




712 


656 




693 


731 


809 


672 


Total 




4,264 


4,192 




4,425 


4,178 


4,126 


4,401 


Weatjons 


Firearm 




135 


115 




124 


120 


154 


162 


Knife 




53 


48 




55 


41 


48 


73 


Other 




496 


534 




476 


535 


518 


415 


Physical 
Force 




3,580 


3,495 




3,770 


3,482 


3,406 


3,751 


Total 




4,264 


4,192 




4,425 


4,178 


4,126 


4,401 



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LAW 

ENFORCEMENT 

EMPLOYEE DATA 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program in Maryland incorporates the 
collection of pertinent data relating to the police of the State. 
Information regarding police employee strength is discussed in this 
section. 

This info2rmation is submitted by county, municipal and state law 

enforcement agencies and compiled on an annual basis. Specific 

information concerning the number of law enforcement employees 
reflects the status as of October 31, 1996. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE RATES 

In 1996, the average number of full-time law enforcement employees 
(state, county and municipal) including civilian employees, amounted 
to 3.4 for each 1,000 inhabitants of the state. The rate based on 
sworn personnel only (excluding civilians), amounted to 2.7 per 1,000 
population. In 1995, the average number of full time law enforcement 
employees amounted to 3.4 for each 1,000 inhabitants, and 2.7 sworn 
personnel per 1,000 inhabitants of the state. 

The ratio of law enforcement employees per 1,000 population in any 
given area or municipality is influenced by a number of factors, much 
the same as the crime rate. The determination of law enforcement 
strength for a given county or municipality is based on factors such 
as population density, size and character of the community, 
geographic location, proximity to metropolitan areas and other 
conditions which exist in the area generating the need for law 
enforcement services. Employee rates also differ among agencies 
since, in particular, there is a wide variation of the 
responsibilities and level of activity within various law enforcement 
agencies. The information in this section relates to reported police 
employee strength and should not be interpreted as recommended 
strength for any area. 

CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES 

The personnel of each law enforcement agency differ as to the demands 
and responsibilities placed before them. Many police officers are 
fully occupied with clerical tasks and are not free to perform active 
police duties. Some police administrators use civilians in this 
capacity, thus freeing the sworn personnel for actual police related 
services . 

As of October 31, 1996, 3,955 or 23 percent of the total number of 
police employees in Maryland were civilians. 

198 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE RATES 

* NUMBER SWORN **RATE 

REGION I 1,041 2.8 

Caroline County 60 2.1 

Cecil County 183 2.3 

Dorchester County 80 2.6 

Kent County 47 2.5 

Queen Anne ' s County 77 2.1 

Somerset County 67 2.8 

Talbot County 92 2.8 

Wicomico County 225 2.8 

Worcester County 210 5.3 

REGION II 424 1.7 

Calvert County 97 1.5 

Charles County 199 1.8 

St. Mary's County 128 1.6 

REGION III 873 1.6 

Allegany County 169 2.3 

Carroll County 176 1.3 

Frederick County 262 1.5 

Garrett County 58 1.9 

Washington County 208 1.6 

REGION IV 3,234 2.0 

Montgomery County 1,319 1.6 

Pr. George's County 1,915 2.5 

REGION V 7,167 3 .1 

Baltimore City - 3,488 4.9 

Anne Arundel County 881 1.9 

Baltimore County 2,000 2.8 

Harford County 333 1.6 

Howard County 465 2.2 

STATEWIDE 729 



STATE TOTALS 13,468 2.7 

*Number sworn persons only 
**Rate per 1,000 population 



199 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
TOTAL SWORN CIVILIAN MALE FEMALE 



REGION I 1,289 1,041 248 1,052 237 

CAROLINE COUNTY 66 60 6 58 8 



Denton 


10 


9 


1 


9 


1 


Federalsburg 


10 


9 


1 


9 


1 


Greensboro 


3 


3 





3 





Preston 


3 


3 





3 





Ridgely 


3 


3 





3 





Sheriff's Dept. 


20 


18 


2 


17 


3 


State Police 


17 


15 


2 


14 


3 


CECIL COUNTY 


228 


183 


45 


192 


36 


Elkton 


32 


25 


7 


24 


8 


North East 


7 


6 


1 


6 


1 


Rising Sun 


5 


4 


1 


5 





Sheriff's Dept. 


53 


42 


11 


44 


9 


State Police 


131 


106 


25 


113 


18 



DORCHESTER COUNTY 102 80 22 85 17 



Cambridge 


53 


41 


12 


42 


11 


Hurlock 


3 


3 





2 


1 


Sheriff's Dept. 


30 


22 


8 


25 


5 


State Police 


16 


14 


2 


16 





KENT COUNTY 


53 


47 


6 


48 


5 


Chestertown 


11 


9 


2 


10 


1 


Rock Hall 


4 


4 





4 





Sheriff's Dept. 


20 


19 


1 


17 


3 


State Police 


18 


15 


3 


17 


1 


QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 


100 


77 


23 


83 


17 


Centreville 


6 


6 





5 


1 


Sheriff's Dept. 


35 


31 


4 


32 


3 


State Police 


59 


40 


19 


46 


13 



200 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



SOMERSET COUNTY 



TOTAL 
78 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
SWQRN C IVILIAN MALE 



67 



11 



65 



NUMBER 
FEMALE 

13 



Crisfield 11 

Princess Anne 8 

UMES 17 

Sheriff's Dept . 15 

State Police 27 



9 

7 

13 
13 
25 



14 
15 
22 



TALBOT COUNTY 



117 



92 



25 



96 



21 



Easton 


48 


37 


11 


38 


10 


Oxford 


3 


3 





3 





St. Michael's 


8 


7 


1 


7 


1 


Sheriff's Dept. 


15 


13 


2 


12 


3 


State Police 


43 


32 


11 


36 


7 



WICOMICO COUNTY 



283 



225 



211 



72 



Delmar 


12 


11 


1 


11 


1 


Fruitland 


11 


10 


1 


8 


3 


Salisbury 


102 


77 


25 


73 


29 


Salisbury State 


19 


17 


2 


15 


4 


Sheriff's Dept. 


72 


57 


15 


51 


21 


State Police 


67 


53 


14 


53 


14 



WORCESTER COUNTY 



262 



210 



52 



214 



48 



Berlin 


19 


14 


5 


15 


4 


Ocean City 


110 


93 


17 


86 


24 


Ocean Pines 


16 


11 


5 


14 


2 


Pocomoke City 


17 


13 


4 


15 


2 


Snow Hill 


8 


8 





8 





Sheriff's Dept. 


31 


26 


5 


25 


6 


State Police 


61 


45 


16 


51 


10 


REGION II 


565 


424 


141 


447 


118 



CALVERT COUNTY 



120 



97 



23 



101 



19 



Sheriff's Dept. 


71 


60 


11 


61 


10 


State Police 


49 


37 


12 


40 


9 



201 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 







NUMBER 


NUMBER 


NUMBER 


NUMBER 




TOTAL 


.SWORN 


CIVILIAN 


MALE 


FEMALE 


z^LES COUNTY 


278 


199 


79 


210 


68 


LaPlata 


9 


9 





9 





Sheriff's Dept . 


219 


155 


64 


164 


55 


State Police 


50 


35 


15 


37 


13 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 167 128 39 136 31 



St. Mary's College 


10 


5 


5 


7 


3 


Sheriff's Dept. 


102 


81 


21 


87 


15 


State Police 


55 


42 


13 


42 


13 



REGION III 1,192 873 319 985 207 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 207 169 38 182 25 



Cumberland 


65 


57 


8 


58 


7 


Frostburg 


18 


14 


4 


14 


4 


Frostburg State 


20 


15 


5 


15 


5 


Luke 


2 


2 





2 





Westernport 


5 


5 





5 





Sheriff's Dept. 


30 


21 


9 


27 


3 


State Police 


67 


55 


12 


61 


6 



CARROLL COUNTY 216 17 6 40 177 39 



Hamp stead 


1 


1 





1 





Manchester 


3 


3 





3 





Springfield Hosp. 


16 


7 


9 


13 


3 


Sykesville 


8 


7 


1 


7 


1 


Taneytown 


8 


8 





8 





Westminster 


45 


36 


9 


32 


13 


Sheriff's Dept. 


32 


28 


4 


27 


5 


State Police 


103 


86 


17 


86 


17 



FREDERICK COUNTY 335 262 73 274 61 



Brunswick 


11 


9 


2 


8 


3 


Frederick 


122 


98 


24 


100 


22 


Thurmont 


8 


8 





8 





Sheriff's Dept. 


108 


80 


28 


88 


20 


State Police 


86 


67 


19 


70 


16 



202 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



TOTAL 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
SWORN CIVILIAN MALE 



NUMBER 
EEMALE 



GARRETT COUNTY 
Oakland 
Sheriff's Dept 
State Police 



89 

7 
31 
51 



58 

6 

17 

35 



31 

1 

14 

16 



78 

6 

26 

46 



11 
1 
5 
5 



WASHINGTON COUNTY 



345 



208 



137 



274 



71 



Hagerstown 
Hancock 
Smithsburg 
Sheriff's Dept 
State Police 



111 

4 

2 

157 

71 



89 
3 
2 

60 
54 



22 

1 



97 

17 



87 
3 
2 

118 
64 



24 
1 


39 
7 



REGION IV 



4,105 



3,234 



871 



3,019 



1,086 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



1,685 



1,319 



366 



1,208 



477 



Chevy Chase 


13 


9 


4 


9 


4 


Gaithersburg 


34 


31 


3 


27 


7 


MD Nat. Cap. Park 


100 


78 


22 


72 


28 


Montgomery 


1,248 


972 


276 


871 


377 


Rockville 


52 


37 


15 


40 


12 


Takoma Park 


50 


42 


8 


40 


10 


Sheriff's Dept. 


114 


102 


12 


82 


32 


State Police 


74 


48 


26 


67 


7 



PR. GEORGE'S COUNTY 2,42 



1,915 



505 



:il 



609 



Berwyn Heights 


6 


6 





6 





Bladensburg 


22 


16 


6 


16 


6 


Bowie State Univ. 


22 


16 


6 


13 


9 


Capitol Heights 


9 


7 


2 


7 


2 


Cheverly 


13 


11 


2 


10 


3 


Cottage City 


4 


4 





4 





District Heights 


8 


7 


1 


8 





Edmonston 


7 


7 





7 





Forest Heights 


5 


5 





4 


1 


Glen Arden 


9 


8 


1 


7 


2 


Greenbelt 


62 


48 


14 


47 


15 



203 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



TOTAL 



PR. GEORGE'S COUNTY 






(CON'T) 






Hyattsville 


32 


25 


Landover Hills 


5 


5 


Laurel 


65 


48 


MD Nat. Cap. Park 


104 


83 


Morningside 


5 


5 


Mt. Rainier 


18 


14 


Pr. George's 


1,522 


1,220 


Riverdale 


19 


14 


Seat Pleasant 


11 


9 


UMCP 


82 


63 


University Park 


7 


7 


Sheriff's Dept . 


255 


195 


State Police 


128 


92 


REGION V 


9,179 


7,167 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
SWORN CIVILIAN MALE 





17 

21 



4 

302 

5 

2 

19 



60 

36 



2,012 



28 

5 
49 
79 

5 

14 

128 

16 

9 

53 

6 

184 

106 



7,007 



NUMBER 
FEMALE 



4 



16 

25 



4 

394 

3 

2 

29 

1 

71 

22 



2,172 



BALTIMORE CITY 



4,239 



3,488 



751 



3,251 



988 



Baltimore City 


3,658 


3, 081 


577 


2,804 


854 


Coppin State 


16 


15 


1 


11 


5 


General Services 


53 


24 


29 


36 


17 


Morgan State Univ. 


46 


32 


14 


33 


13 


Mass Transit 


125 


118 


7 


102 


23 


Univ. of Balto. 


45 


13 


32 


32 


13 


UMAB 


119 


58 


61 


81 


38 


Sheriff's Dept. 


116 


112 


4 


98 


18 


State Police 


61 


35 


26 


54 


7 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 1,170 



881 



289 



866 



304 



Annapolis 


147 


118 


29 


106 


41 


Anne Arundel 


771 


586 


185 


583 


188 


General Services 


53 


21 


32 


31 


22 


Sheriff's Dept. 


50 


41 


9 


40 


10 


State Police 


149 


115 


34 


106 


43 



204 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
TOTAL SWORN CIVILIAN MM^ EEMALE 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 2,610 2,000 610 2,009 601 



Baltimore Co. 


1, 832 


1,545 


287 


1,469 


363 


Port Admin. 


64 


57 


7 


55 


9 


Towson State Univ. 


47 


33 


14 


39 


8 


UMBO 


28 


19 


9 


22 


6 


Sheriff's Dept . 


76 


62 


14 


64 


12 


State Police 


563 


284 


279 


360 


203 



HARFORD COUNTY 507 333 174 401 106 



Aberdeen 


46 


37 


9 


35 


11 


Bel Air 


41 


30 


11 


29 


12 


Havre de Grace 


31 


24 


7 


22 


9 


Sheriff's Dept. 


302 


173 


129 


240 


62 


State Police 


87 


69 


18 


75 


12 



HOWARD COUNTY 653 465 188 480 173 



Howard 


390 


318 


72 


290 


100 


Sheriff's Dept. 


47 


28 


19 


31 


16 


State Police 


216 


119 


97 


159 


57 



STATEWIDE AGENCIES 1,093 729 364 855 23 

MD Invest. Service 
MD Park Service 
MD Trans. Authority 
Natural Resources 
State Fire Marshal 
Dept. of Coir.-IIU 



MARYLAND'S TOTAL 17,423 13,468 3,955 13,365 4,058 



39 


10 


29 


32 


7 


378 


187 


191 


297 


81 


348 


296 


52 


261 


87 


253 


190 


63 


208 


45 


61 


37 


24 


48 


13 


14 


9 


5 


9 


5 



205 



CRIME INDEX FOR MARYLAND 

10 YEAR TREND 



1996 1995 1994 1993 



1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 



OFFENSES 


555 


588 


•RATE 


11.4 


11.6 


PERCENT CLEARED 


69 


61 


NATIONAL AVERAGE 


67 


67 



MURDER 

596 579 632 596 

11.8 11.6 12.7 12.1 

62 67 72 67 

65 64 66 65 



569 


••553 


540 


452 


••444 


11.7 


11.5 


11.5 


9.7 


9.8 


69 


75 


71 


72 


73 



OFFENSES 

♦RATE 

PERCENT CLEARED 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 



2,035 1,907 

42.0 37.6 

58 50 

52 52 



2,130 2.037 

42.2 40.7 

55 59 

52 52 



RAPE 

2,185 2,280 

44.0 46.5 

58 61 

53 50 



2,229 2,185 1,783 

45.9 45.7 38.0 

60 61 59 

52 53 52 



1,721 1,894 

37.1 41.8 

58 56 



OFFENSES 

♦RATE 

PERCENT CLEARED 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 



18,416 19,935 

378.1 393.0 

23 24 

25 27 



ROBBERY 

21,331 20,146 21,580 21,054 

423.1 402.4 434.6 429.0 

22 21 20 21 

25 24 24 24 



19,781 17,393 15,584 13,991 13,363 

407.0 363.8 332.0 301.3 294.7 

22 22 25 25 24 

24 25 26 26 27 



OFFENSES 23,624 24,798 

♦RATE 486.3 488.9 

PERCENT CLEARED 62 61 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 57 58 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

25,699 24,692 25,161 25,110 23,846 23,837 22,206 21,290 19,597 

509.7 493.2 506.8 511.6 490.7 498.5 473.1 458.4 432.1 

58 59 60 61 63 63 64 67 66 

56 56 56 56 57 57 57 57 59 



OFFENSES 53,802 50,316 

♦RATE 1,110.8 992.0 

PERCENT CLEARED 17 16 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 14 14 



BURGLARY 

53,311 52,225 56,237 55,521 56,255 53,537 52,698 54,696 53,226 

1,057.3 1,043.2 1,132.7 1,131.2 1,157.5 1,119.7 1,122.7 1,177.8 1,173.7 

16 15 15 17 18 16 18 17 18 

13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 



OFFENSES 

♦RATE 

PERCENT CLEARED 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 



157,678 175,283 

3,244.2 3,455.9 

19 20 



20 



20 



LARCENY-THEFT 

178,086 168,568 163,443 165,236 163,564 147,390 136,929 141,416 136,863 

3,532.1 3,367.3 3,291.9 3,366.7 3,365.5 3,082.5 2,917.1 3,045.1 3,017.9 

18 19 19 19 19 19 20 19 18 

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 



OFFENSES 33,821 

♦RATE 695.9 

PERCENT CLEARED 16 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 14 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

36,076 36,176 38,194 33,926 35,657 35,517 33,885 31,163 31,198 26,419 

711.3 717.5 763.0 683.3 726.5 730.8 708.7 663.9 671.8 582.6 

14 12 15 15 15 17 16 17 18 18 

14 14 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 



OFFENSES 289,931 308,903 

♦RATE PER 5,968.7 6,090.4 

PERCENT CLEARED 22 22 

NATIONAL AVERAGE 21 22 



GRAND TOTAL 

317,329 306,441 303,164 305,454 301,761 278,780 260,903 264,764 251,806 

6,293.7 6,121.5 6,106.0 6,223.6 6,209.1 5,830.4 5,558.2 5,701.2 5,552.5 

21 21 22 22 22 23 23 23 23 

21 21 21 21 21 22 21 21 21 



RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS 



ADJUSTED 



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